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Nauvoo News

Nauvoo News & Events features stories shared from members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints around the world.  This includes official Church news releases and contributed articles by Latter-day Saint authors - as well as events & stories from YOU.

Missionaries In the Snow - Photo Tour

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS: Missionaries struggle with snow in many places around the globe. Here are some fun great random photos of Missionaries doing just that.

175th Anniversary of Joseph and Hyrum Smith’s Martyrdom -

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS - This summer will mark 175 years since a mob stormed the Carthage Jail in Illinois and shot the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum Smith. “This June 27th will be a beautiful time to be in Nauvoo. There are several events planned to commemorate the lives of Jospeh & Hyrum Smith” says Kelli Jenkins, Nauvoo Visitors Office Director

President Joseph F. Smith, the son of Hyrum Smith and the sixth President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, recorded these feelings about the martyrdom: “The martyrdom has always been an inspiration to the people of the Lord. It has helped them in their individual trials; has given them courage to pursue a course in righteousness and to know and to live truth, and must ever be held in sacred memory by the Latter-day Saints who have learned the great truths that God revealed through his servant, Joseph Smith”

This year marks the 175th anniversary of that monumental event.

The martyrdom is one of several notable dates and anniversaries for the Church in 2019. The list includes milestones in the Young Women program, a historic site in northern Utah, the first temple built outside the continental United States, and significant moments in the history of missionary work, among others.

One century later

One century after Joseph and Hyrum were killed, the Church purchased land in Spring Hill, Daviess County, Missouri. The property is more commonly known to Latter-day Saints as Adam-ondi-Ahman (see Doctrine and Covenants 116).

The property deeds listed the date June 27, 1944, marking the 100th anniversary of the martyrdom.

Additionally, Church members commemorated the 100th anniversary by holding memorial services. A special service was held at Carthage Jail.

President Howard W. Hunter and other Church leaders visited Carthage Jail and delivered remarks in a special meeting in 1994 to commemorate the 150th anniversary.

Young Women

In November 1869—150 years ago—the Church founded the forerunner for today’s Young Women program.

That year, Brigham Young established the Young Ladies’ Retrenchment Association, later renamed the Young Women Mutual Improvement Association, in the Lion House. The first president of the organization, Elmina Shepherd Taylor, was called in 1880.

In 1944, a plaque dedicated by President Heber J. Grant was placed in the Lion House to celebrate the 75th anniversary.

Golden spike

In May 1869—150 years ago—workers completed the transcontinental railroad at Promontory Summit in Box Elder County. The wedding of the rails strengthened the general economy of the Church in Utah and had a significant impact on immigration.

Temples

In November 1919—100 years ago—President Grant dedicated a new temple in Laie, Hawaii, the fifth temple in the Church and the first to be built outside the continental United States.

In February 1994—25 years ago—the First Presidency announced plans to renovate the Uintah Stake Tabernacle into a temple. When dedicated in 1997, the Vernal Utah Temple, the first existing building to be renovated into a temple, became the state’s 10th temple.

Missionary work

In April 1844—175 years ago—Addison Pratt, Benjamin F. Grouard, and Noah Rogers landed on Tubuai, 350 miles south of Tahiti, and opened missionary work in the South Pacific.

In November 1969—50 years ago—the Southeast Asia Mission formally opened with headquarters in Singapore. The following year, the first missionaries traveled to Indonesia, which was part of the mission.

Change in Church leadership

In May 1994—25 years ago—President Ezra Taft Benson died at age 94 after more than eight years of service as Church President. A short time later, President Hunter was set apart as the new President. He selected President Gordon B. Hinckley and President Thomas S. Monson as his counselors.

Missionaries Now Have More Options to Communicate With Families

Nauvoo News

The First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has announced an update to guidelines regarding communication between full-time missionaries and their families.

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Effective immediately, missionaries may communicate with their families on their weekly preparation day via text messages, online messaging, phone calls and video chat in addition to letters and emails. Previously, missionaries relied primarily on email and letters for communication. 

“Regular communication with their families is an important part of a missionary’s service,” said the First Presidency in a statement. “One of the major purposes of this adjustment is to encourage families to be more involved in their missionary’s efforts and experiences.”

Under these new guidelines, missionaries are encouraged to use judgment in determining the length of phone calls and video chats and to be considerate of their companions. Additionally, to avoid disruption to missionary schedules, family members are asked not to initiate calls or chats but instead should wait for the missionary to contact them on his or her weekly preparation day. If a missionary’s parents live in different locations, he or she may contact each parent separately.

With so many advances in technology, this communication should take place at little or no cost. In those locations where families or missionaries do not have access to computers or phones, missionaries will be encouraged to continue using their current means of communication.

“We encourage missionaries to communicate with their families each week using whatever approved method missionaries decide,” said Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and chairman of the Missionary Executive Council. “This may vary based on their circumstances, locations and schedules for that week. It is not expected that all missionaries will call or video chat with their parents every week. The precise manner of communication is left up to the missionary as he or she decides what will best meet their needs.”

In addition to weekly communication, missionaries are also encouraged to contact family on other special occasions such as Christmas, Mother's Day, Father's Day, parents' birthdays and other culturally significant holidays.

Elder Uchtdorf said the new guidelines offer several additional benefits, including accommodating varied family circumstances as well as better supporting those missionaries who would benefit from increased personal contact with family at home.

Currently, more than 65,000 missionaries serve throughout the world in a variety of countries and cultures as representatives of Jesus Christ. Serving full-time, they study the gospel and teach its life-changing principles to people who are interested. Young men serve for 24 months beginning as early as age 18, and young women may serve for 18 months as early as age 19. They gain valuable and life-changing experiences along the way, giving of themselves and serving others.

“We love the missionaries and know the Lord values their selfless service,” said Elder Uchtdorf. “We continue to try to find the best ways to support and help them and their families while they serve.”

Nauvoo Visitors Guide & Online Tour of Nauvoo

Nauvoo News

Nauvoo Visitors Guide: Whether you’re coming to see the Nauvoo Pageant or Begin your exploration of historic Nauvoo by examining the 1846 relief map of Nauvoo, viewing an introductory video, and studying historic artifacts and displays. Gather information on over two dozen restored homes, shops, and religious buildings in Nauvoo.

Nauvoo—Brigham Young Nauvoo Home

Visit the home of Brigham Young, the second President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, leader of the Church's movement to the West, and first territorial governor of Utah.  350 N Main Street (Main and Cutler) Nauvoo, Illinois


Nauvoo—Carthage Jail Near Nauvoo

On June 27, 1844, the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were martyred—killed by a mob that attacked them in Carthage Jail. Joseph “sealed his mission and his works with his own blood; and so [did] his brother Hyrum. In life they were not divided, and in death they were not separated!” (Doctrine and Covenants 135:3). The original jail in Carthage, Illinois, has been carefully restored and is about a 30-minute drive from Historic Nauvoo. Missionaries lead tours there, where visitors learn about the ministry of Joseph Smith and the final days in the life of Joseph and Hyrum.

At Carthage Jail, visitors also learn about two other men, Elders John Taylor and Willard Richards of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. They were in the jail when the mob attacked, and they survived. The Church itself also survived, as Apostles and others built on the foundation the Lord had established through His servant Joseph Smith.

Nauvoo—Nauvoo Cultural Hall

Visit the heart of Old Nauvoo's social life. During the evening, it's still the place to be! Rendezvous in Old Nauvoo, a musical drama documenting life during the city’s golden age, is performed nightly throughout the year. 350 N Main Street (Main and Cutler) Nauvoo, Illinois







Old & New Beehive Dishes & Dinnerware Collection -

Dena Kennedy

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NAUVOO REVIEW - Check out this old & new collection of beehive dishes & dinnerware. From the Lion House to the Nauvoo Mercantile antique collection these are some of our favorite beehive & bee dishes.

Nauvoo Exodus Commemoration Draws Hundreds

Dena Kennedy

NAUVOO NEWS - Hundreds gathered in Nauvoo today for the 9th Annual Nauvoo Exodus Commemoration & Reenactment. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints hosts this meaningful event on the first Saturday of February each year to mark the exodus of the Latter-day Saint pioneers from Nauvoo over 170 years ago.

At the free breakfast served to the public at the Family Living Center by the Nauvoo missionaries, President Mark Lusvardi of the Illinois Nauvoo Mission welcomed the crowds and shared some brief remarks. The Family Living Center is located behind the historic Cultural Hall in the center of old Nauvoo.

The marchers formed ranks & companies and were led by a flag bearer and drummer boy. A troop dressed as the Nauvoo Legion then began the hundreds of people, wagons, horses, and oxen to Nauvoo’s Parley street and the Trail of Hope. “This is an amazing event each year and it’s a privilege to participate in it.” said Susan Clark, who drove with her family from Omaha, Nebraska to take part in the commemoration.

Each year, the commemoration has seen an increase in attendance. The Untold Nauvoo Stories Symposium is held on the same weekend making for a busy weekend in Nauvoo.

“We come from the Quad Cities every year and we love it” says Dale Oliver, who has relatives that left with the Saints in 1846. “We wouldn’t miss it”.

“My husband and I are not members of the Mormon faith, we just happened to be in town. It’s really an experience to see all these folks honor their history.” said Elizabeth Finsterwalder from Ames, Iowa. “We feel very luck to have caught this.”


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Nauvoo Hotels - Reserve Early for 2019

Nauvoo News

The Woodruff Hotel in Nauvoo features 21 beautiful guest rooms and suites, each with lovely furnishings & decor to enhance your visit to Nauvoo.  We are pleased to provide beautiful rooms with walkout balconies offering stunning views of the Nauvoo Temple and Mississippi River.  From classic couples rooms to large five-bedroom Nauvoo family suites,  the Woodruff is ideal for any family wishing to stay together in Nauvoo.  Whether you're visiting for a Nauvoo family reunion, a Nauvoo wedding, or just great family Nauvoo vacations, you'll love the Woodruff Hotel. 




NAUVOO HOTELS APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS:

The various Hotels in Nauvoo & Nauvoo merchants strive to provide friendly service and deeply appreciate your business . We encourage you to make the most of your experience by staying right in any historic Nauvoo hotels and motels. besides, you'll love being here for the late-night walks and the historic atmosphere that can only come from a stay right in beautiful Nauvoo.  We're certain you'll enjoy Nauvoo hotels and motels and any Nauvoo Illinois lodging.

Actors Invited to Audition for 2019 Nauvoo and British Pageant Core Cast

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS - The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is seeking professional-quality actors to audition for 21 core cast roles in the Nauvoo and British pageants, which will be performed on alternating nights in Nauvoo during the summer of 2019.

Twelve men's roles and nine women's roles are available, ages 20s through 60s. There is one role for a teenage boy. (Please note that cast members under 18 years of age will need to have a parent/guardian with them in Salt Lake City and Nauvoo for the duration of the rehearsals and performances.)

The core cast auditions will be held at the end of January and beginning of February. For more information or to sign up for an audition time, visit https://www.signupgenius.com/go/60b0e4ea5ad2fa6f49-2019.

For those who are not able to attend the auditions in person, please send an email to culturalarts@ldschurch.org for information about submitting a video audition.

Core cast rehearsals will be held in Salt Lake City in June 2019 and will move to Nauvoo, Illinois, on June 24. Performances for both pageants will be July 9 through August 3, 2019.

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Two Rare Historic Church Books Stolen From BYU Library

Nauvoo News

A self-proclaimed Latter-day Saint antiquities dealer pleaded guilty last week to stealing eight books and a historic picture from the Brigham Young University library.

Investigators discovered Orem resident Kevin Mark Ronald Schuwer visited the Harold B. Lee Library in Provo between September and November 2018, according to court documents.

During those visits, he checked out eight books valued at $300 each from the Special Collections section. A police report stated he initially told officers he only checked out six books.

READ MORE HERE

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When the Saints Left Nauvoo for the Rocky Mountains

Dena Kennedy

A Circular of The High Council. To the Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and to All Whom It May Concern. Nauvoo, 1846.

In late 1845, the leadership of the church had still not made a definitive decision on where the Saints would move. A variety of locations had been considered and several had become favorites. The publications of Lansford W. Hastings, John C. Fremont and others had been consulted and the Times and Seasons for November and December had suggested the Pacific coast would be their destination. But even as late as December 26 Brigham Young had written to Samuel Brannan in New York and indicated that the destination was still undecided. So it appears that in January 1846 not only did the general membership of the church not know for sure where they would be moving but church leadership was not certain either. But by January 20 the Nauvoo High Council issued this broadside stating that:

"We...embrace this opportunity to inform you, that we intend to send out into the Western country from this place, some time in the early part of the month of March, a company of pioneers...Our pioneers are instructed to proceed West until they find a good place to make a crop, in some good valley in the neighborhood of the Rocky Mountains..."

This is the first public announcement of the Mormons' intention to establish a settlement in the Great Basin rather than somewhere on the west coast. But less than two weeks later the plans for a March exodus had to be altered. On January 29 rumors began to circluate that state troops intended to arrest certain Mormons leaders. This along with a letter from Sam Brannan to Brigham Young suggesting that the federal government was planning to confiscate the saints' arms and prevent them from leaving, convinced the church leadership to leave immediately. So on February 4, 1846 the first wagons ferried across the Mississippi River and the evacuation of Nauvoo was on.

20 Stunning Photos of the Moroni Statue on Temples

Nauvoo News

This is a collection of what we feel are among the most stunning photos of the statue of Moroni.

All Sister Missionaries Now Have Option of Wearing Slacks

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS - Sister missionaries serving for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints now have the option to wear pants during regular missionary activities—including during normal training activities at missionary training centers.

The First Presidency updated the missionary dress and grooming guidelines for sister missionaries in a letter sent to local Church leaders dated December 20, 2018.

Sister missionaries should continue to wear dresses or skirts when attending the temple and during Sunday worship services, leadership and zone conferences, baptismal services, and missionary training center devotionals, according to the letter. In areas where for cultural reasons it is not acceptable for women (including sister missionaries) to wear dress slacks, sister missionaries may choose to wear ankle-length skirts for additional protection from extreme weather and vector-borne diseases such as Zika, dengue fever, West Nile virus, Lyme disease, and malaria, according to the letter.

The adjustment to dress standards, which takes effect immediately, was approved by the First Presidency and is primarily motivated by safety concerns, said Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and chairman of the Missionary Executive Council.

“Adjustments to the missionary dress and grooming standards have changed over time since the beginning of the Restoration of the gospel of Jesus Christ in 1830 and will continue to do so in the future,” said Elder Uchtdorf. “As we adapt these standards, we always carefully consider the dignity of the missionary calling to represent Jesus Christ; the safety, security, and health of our beloved missionaries; and the cultural sensitivities of the places where they serve.”

Sister Bonnie H. Cordon, Young Women General President and a member of the Missionary Executive Council, elaborated on the changes for sister missionaries.

“There are a lot of vector-borne diseases because of mosquitoes and ticks and fleas,” said Sister Cordon. “This helps the sisters to prevent any of those bites or at least minimizes them.”

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has given sister missionaries the option of wearing dress slacks in their work.

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The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has given sister missionaries the option of wearing dress slacks in their work.

Sister missionaries in roughly half of the Church’s missions have previously been wearing dress slacks during the wet seasons to help protect them from mosquito-borne viral diseases such as dengue fever, Chikungunya, and Zika. This latest change will allow all sister missionaries to do so year-round, based on their own discretion.

“This is truly optional,” said Sister Cordon. “The sisters can wear dresses, they can wear slacks, whatever will help them in their service as they’re out amongst the people.”

In addition to safety concerns, Sister Cordon said the change will help sister missionaries who serve in cold climates to stay warm. Wearing dress slacks will also make it easier for sister missionaries to ride bicycles.

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“Sister missionaries are amazing people,” said Sister Cordon. “We want to make sure that they’re protected.”

In missions where sister missionaries were not previously approved to wear dress slacks, the mission provides funds for young sister missionaries who entered a missionary training center before March 1, 2019, to purchase three to four pairs of dress slacks (or long skirts, as explained above).

Details of the revised missionary dress and grooming guidelines can be found online.

First Recorded Christmas in Church History

Nauvoo News

There are few details about the Christmas in the early days of the Church.

Christmas in early Church was not celebrated in the traditional gift-giving manner like today. It wasn't even a particularly festive occasion. It would be many years before English immigrants would introduce carols, yule logs, and presents into the Puritan like tradition of members of the Church.

Early American settlers were strongly against the “impure” practices of European sects - including Christmas celebrations. Massachusetts, in 1657 imposed a fine of five shillings or a jail term for idleness, feasting, or participating in any Christmas festivities. Even mince pies were prohibited in Connecticut because of the dish’s association with the Christmas season.

Members of the Church with mostly Calvinist and Methodist backgrounds did not totally abandon their religious upbringings, and thus there is no mention of Christmas in the “Journal History” of the Church until 1841. The first Christmas of the Latter-days was in Nauvoo at Willard Richard’s home. The Church recorder made this entry for December 25:

“Being Christmas, Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Orson Pratt, Wilford Woodruff, John Taylor and their wives, and Willard Richards spent the evening at Dr. Richard’s home; and after supper, Mr. Kimball gave each of the Twelve Apostles a fractional lot of land lying on the west side of his second addition to Nauvoo.”

The first recorded glimpse of a Christmas celebration was written on Christmas Day in 1843 by the Prophet Joseph Smith. The entry marks a new outlook among Latter-day Saints towards the day:

“This morning, about one o’clock, I was awoken by an English sister, Lettice Rushton, … accompanied by three of her sons, with their wives, and her two daughters, with their husbands, and several of their neighbors, singing, ‘Mortals, Awake With Angels Join,’ which caused a thrill of pleasure to run through my soul. All of my family and boarders arose to hear the serenade, and I felt to thank my Heavenly Father for their visit, and blessed them in the name of the Lord. They also visited my brother Hyrum, who was awakened from his sleep. He arose and went out of doors. He shook hands with and blessed each one of them in the name of the Lord, and said that at first he thought a cohort of angels had come to visit him, it was such heavenly music to him.”

Later in the day the Prophet wrote the following took place:

“A large party supped at my house, and spent the evening in music, dancing, etc. in a most cheerful and friendly manner.”

Since that time many of our traditions associated with Christmas bring to mind special foods that are served to friends and relatives. Yet there is no record that the Saints in Nauvoo prepared any uniquely Yuletide treats. Most likely a Christmas dinner would have consisted of the same items available during the rest of the winter. Households usually had in supply flour, sugar, potatoes, beans, corn, salt, and dried meats and fruits. Lacking precise measuring utensils, the housewives of Nauvoo were accustomed to adding a “pinch of salt” or a “handful of sugar.” Oven temperatures were tested by the feel of heat upon the hand, and baked bread had a certain look as well as texture when ready to be removed from the oven. A big favorite of early members was ice cream that they made from snow, sugar and a little flavoring. Candy was made from molasses; and currants were worked into delicious jellies and jams.

The Nauvoo Neighbor, the Saint’s weekly newspaper, ran recipes for such favorites as Admiral Peacock’s Pickle for Meat (“The beef, after lying in the pickle for ten weeks, has been found as good as if it had been salted three days and as tender as a chicken.”) Information on how to salvage frozen potatoes, the best method for fattening turkeys (they should be fed “soft bricks broken into pieces, with charcoal also broken and with six grains of corn per day”), and ways to preserve hams, apples, and sweet potatoes were popular front-page articles.

Citizens were also told correct cow milking procedures: “If you would obtain all the milk from the cow you must treat her with the upmost gentleness; she must not stand trembling under your blows nor under your threats. She may at times need a little chastisement, but at such times you need not expect all her milk.”

Other “recipes” included in the paper were intended to cure ills of the temperament:

“A complete cure for a terrible disorder of the mouth commonly called ‘Scandal’ :

“Take a good nature, one ounce; of an herb called by the Mormons ‘mind your own business,’ one ounce, to which add of the oil of benevolence, one drachim and of brotherly love, two ounces. You must mix the preceding ingredients with a little charity for others, and a few sprigs of ‘keep your tongue between your teeth.’ Let this compound be allowed to simmer for a short time in a vessel called circumspection, and it will be ready for use.

“Symptoms: The symptoms are a violent itching in the tongue and roof of the mouth when you are in company with a species of animals called ‘Gossips.’

“Applications: When you feel a fit of the disorder coming on, take a teaspoonful of the mixture, hold it in your mouth, which you must keep closely shut till you get home.”

In a more traditional sense citizens in Nauvoo might be treated to recipes such as potato pancakes, applesauce cake, ginger cookies, and rusk, a cornbread cereal. All recipes require the basic ingredients common in Nauvoo homes and have been adapted to modern-day ovens for New Era readers. However, today’s grocery prices may not correspond with those listed in the Nauvoo Neighbor. The going rates in St. Louis included cornmeal, 25 cents per bushel; ginger, 11 cents per pound; lard, 3 1/2 cents per pound; and dried apples, 50 cents per bushel.

Extra gingery cookies, very taterish pancakes, surprisingly moist cake, and super crunchy cereal will invoke the pioneer spirit in you, your friends, and your family.


Written by Mary Stout





Brigham Young’s Donut Recipe - "deliciously tasty"

Nauvoo News

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Brigham Young’s Donuts

This original recipe for buttermilk donuts was contributed by Sister Naomie Young Schettler, a granddaughter of Brigham Young. It was first made by Emily Partridge Young, Sister Schettler’s grandmother. A favorite with President Young, the donuts became so popular that they eventually were sold at the Zion’s Cooperative Mercantile Institution department store in Salt Lake City.

5 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 teaspoons ground nutmeg
2 cups buttermilk
2 large eggs, beaten
1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
6 tablespoons butter, melted
Oil, for frying
Granulated or powdered sugar, optional
Ground cinnamon, optional

Combine ingredients, kneading in enough flour to make a soft dough, not too sticky. Roll out and cut into doughnuts. Fry in deep, hot oil.

Nauvoo Gingerbread Cookie Recipe

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO GINGERBREAD COOKIES: Every year thousands of people visit the beautifully restored Nauvoo, Illinois. Missionary couples, give free tours of the various sites. They explain the history of the city and give demonstrations of some of the skills of the early Saints who helped the city flourish.

But among the sweetest stops you can make in old Nauvoo is at the Scovil Bakery where over 50,000 cookies a year are handed out. Here is a way to take old Nauvoo hime with you.


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Gingerbread Cookies

from the Scovil Bakery
Nauvoo, Illinois

1 cup sugar

1 cup molasses

3/4 cup oil or lard

1/2 cup hot water

2 eggs

1 teaspoon soda

1 heaping teaspoon ginger

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 cups whole wheat flour

4 cups white flour

  1. Combine, sugar, molasses, and oil. Add hot water, measuring it in same cup as molasses so that you get all molasses out of cup.

  2. Add eggs, then beat.

  3. Sift together remaining ingredients.

  4. Refrigerate dough for 1 hour, then roll out and cut with cookie cutters.

  5. Place on lightly greased cookie sheet and bake for 10 minutes at 350° F (180° C).

First Presidency 2018 Christmas Message

Dena Kennedy

NAUVOO NEWS - The First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has released a 2018 Christmas message:

Our Savior, Jesus Christ, offers to us four incomparable gifts—the capacity to love others, the ability to forgive, the blessing of repentance, and the promise of life everlasting. These four unique gifts will bring us more and more joy as we accept and act upon them. They were made possible because Jehovah condescended to come to earth as the baby Jesus. He was born of an immortal Father and a mortal mother. He was born in Bethlehem under the most humble of circumstances. His was the holy birth foreseen by prophets since the days of Adam. Jesus Christ is God’s transcendent gift—the gift of the Father to all of His children. We joyfully celebrate His birth this Christmas season.

TEMPLE SQUARE LIGHTS CHRISTUS TS

Church Releases Statement on Future of Each Pageant

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has made an announcement regarding which pageants will continue on and which ones will be effected by the new changes.

THE FOLLOWING IS AN OFFICIAL STATEMENT FROM THE CHURCH”

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is growing across the earth. As this occurs, local Church leaders and members are encouraged to focus on gospel learning in their homes and to participate in Sabbath worship and the Church’s supporting programs for children, youth, individuals and families. The goal of every activity in the Church should be to increase faith in the Lord Jesus Christ and to share His gospel message throughout the world. Local celebrations of culture and history may be appropriate. Larger productions, such as pageants, are discouraged.

As it relates to existing pageants, conversations with local Church and community leaders took place in October 2018 to appropriately end, modify or continue these productions. Below are the decisions the Church has made from those discussions:

  • The Nauvoo Pageant will continue with support from Church headquarters.

  • The Mesa Pageant will continue under area leadership in 2021 following the renovation of the Mesa Temple.

  • The British Pageant will continue every four years under area leadership. The next pageant will be in 2021.

  • The Hill Cumorah Pageant will end in 2020.

  • The Manti Pageant will end in 2019.

  • The Castle Valley Pageant is discontinued.

  • The Clarkston Pageant is discontinued.



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New Update - Church Announces Which Pageants to Continue

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has made an announcement regarding which pageants will continue on and which ones will be effected by the new changes.

THE FOLLOWING IS AN OFFICIAL STATEMENT FROM THE CHURCH”

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is growing across the earth. As this occurs, local Church leaders and members are encouraged to focus on gospel learning in their homes and to participate in Sabbath worship and the Church’s supporting programs for children, youth, individuals and families. The goal of every activity in the Church should be to increase faith in the Lord Jesus Christ and to share His gospel message throughout the world. Local celebrations of culture and history may be appropriate. Larger productions, such as pageants, are discouraged.

As it relates to existing pageants, conversations with local Church and community leaders took place in October 2018 to appropriately end, modify or continue these productions. Below are the decisions the Church has made from those discussions:

  • The Nauvoo Pageant will continue with support from Church headquarters.

  • The Mesa Pageant will continue under area leadership in 2021 following the renovation of the Mesa Temple.

  • The British Pageant will continue every four years under area leadership. The next pageant will be in 2021.

  • The Hill Cumorah Pageant will end in 2020.

  • The Manti Pageant will end in 2019.

  • The Castle Valley Pageant is discontinued.

  • The Clarkston Pageant is discontinued.

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Nauvoo Mercantile is Now on Pinterest

Nauvoo News

We would love to have you follow us on Pinterest. We just launched and have tuning up our Pinterest page and we are looking forward to adding new items every week.


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IF YOU FOLLOW US ON PINTEREST THIS WEEK

WE WILL SEND YOU A FREE GIFT LINK

THROUGH THE PRIVATE MESSAGE ON

PINTEREST.

The link will let you choose any 4-pack of these

beautiful greeting cards - we’ll even pay the

shipping