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Nauvoo News

Nauvoo News & Events features stories shared from members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints around the world.  This includes official Church news releases and contributed articles by Latter-day Saint authors - as well as events & stories from YOU.

Nauvoo Temple Struck By Lightning - Moroni Statue Damaged

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO: Just shortly after 2pm, the Nauvoo Temple was struck by lightning. The statue Moroni atop the Temple tower took a direct hit from a lightning strike while a severe thunderstorm passed through the area. The shock of the deep boom startled those attending the Temple as well as most citizens in the entire city.

"I was actually looking up at the tower exactly when the strike happened" said Alex Claiborne, a visitor to Nauvoo who was just across the street as it happened - "there was smoke coming off the Moroni statue."

Lightning strikes occur involving the tall temple steeples around the world and the statues are wired with grounding devices to minimize the damage and control the effects of such a strike.

Today’s storm moved quickly and darkened the skies over Nauvoo as it crossed several cities in the area.

There is no report yet as to the extent of the damage.


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See the Salt Lake Temple in Detailed Model - Very Detailed !!

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS - More than a century has passed since the public open house was held for the Salt Lake Temple, but an exhibit featuring a 1:32 scaled replica of the Mormon temple opened today that offers an open house experience of the magnificent building. Earlier this morning, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints unveiled the 88-inch tall, near-identical replica of the temple in the South Visitors’ Center on Temple Square. The permanent exhibit will be open to the public starting at 1:30 p.m. today.

“This replica will show the millions of visitors who come to Temple Square the beauty and majesty of this sacred and historic building,” said Elder Richard G. Hinckley, executive director of the Missionary Department. “Like all temples, once the building is dedicated it is used for sacred Church purposes and not open to the general public, but this exhibit will provide the public with a glimpse of the interior and a feeling of the Spirit that is present there.”

The Salt Lake Temple is a landmark known throughout the world.  When it was last open to the public in April of 1893, the local press reported that approximately 5,000 people, most of whom were not members of the Church, toured the temple before the dedication.  The reports went on to say that “altogether the richness and elegant workmanship of the temple was a revelation of wonder to the visitors.”

Extensive open houses have been held prior to the dedication of newly constructed temples throughout the world and allow visitors to walk through and experience the sacred structures. Once dedicated, temples are in continual, even daily, use by members of the Church for religious purposes. While public open houses for new temples regularly draw tens and even hundreds of thousands of people, millions will likely see this model of the Salt Lake Temple over its lifetime.

“Many people think our temples are like great halls or cathedrals. Actually, they have a number of rooms designed for certain functions such as marriages, baptisms and instructional sessions,” said Elder William R. Walker, executive director of the Church’s Temple Department.

The model of the Salt Lake Temple sits in front of a giant window in the South Visitors’ Center facing the actual building that it replicates. The south and east walls of the replica have been cut away to show depictions of many of the rooms in the temple, including the large assembly hall and rooms where the First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles meet. The baptistery and other ordinance rooms are also depicted. Close attention is paid to detail, and even paintings, furniture and working chandeliers and lamps imitate those found in the actual temple.

Peter McCann Architectural Models of Toronto was commissioned to create the replica last August. Sixteen modelers with different expertise in various parts of the duplication process worked on the project for five months. (Click here for fact sheet, photos and audio sound bites about the creation process).

“This replica will show the millions of visitors who come to Temple Square the beauty and majesty of this sacred and historic building,” said Elder Richard G. Hinckley, executive director of the Missionary Department. “Like all temples, once the building is dedicated it is used for sacred Church purposes and not open to the general public, but this exhibit will provide the public with a glimpse of the interior and a feeling of the Spirit that is present there.”

The Salt Lake Temple is a landmark known throughout the world.  When it was last open to the public in April of 1893, the local press reported that approximately 5,000 people, most of whom were not members of the Church, toured the temple before the dedication.  The reports went on to say that “altogether the richness and elegant workmanship of the temple was a revelation of wonder to the visitors.”

Extensive open houses have been held prior to the dedication of newly constructed temples throughout the world and allow visitors to walk through and experience the sacred structures. Once dedicated, temples are in continual, even daily, use by members of the Church for religious purposes. While public open houses for new temples regularly draw tens and even hundreds of thousands of people, millions will likely see this model of the Salt Lake Temple over its lifetime.

“Many people think our temples are like great halls or cathedrals. Actually, they have a number of rooms designed for certain functions such as marriages, baptisms and instructional sessions,” said Elder William R. Walker, executive director of the Church’s Temple Department.

The model of the Salt Lake Temple sits in front of a giant window in the South Visitors’ Center facing the actual building that it replicates. The south and east walls of the replica have been cut away to show depictions of many of the rooms in the temple, including the large assembly hall and rooms where the First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles meet. The baptistery and other ordinance rooms are also depicted. Close attention is paid to detail, and even paintings, furniture and working chandeliers and lamps imitate those found in the actual temple.

Peter McCann Architectural Models of Toronto was commissioned to create the replica last August. Sixteen modelers with different expertise in various parts of the duplication process worked on the project for five months. (Click here for fact sheet, photos and audio sound bites about the creation process).

“Some of the detail is so fine that we had to find people that were capable of doing it at that scale,” said Josh Coulas, manager of the project for Peter McCann Architectural Models.

More than a century has passed since the public open house was held for the Salt Lake Temple, but an exhibit featuring a 1:32 scaled replica of the Mormon temple opened today that offers an open house experience of the magnificent building. Earlier this morning, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints unveiled the 88-inch tall, near-identical replica of the temple in the South Visitors’ Center on Temple Square. The permanent exhibit will be open to the public starting at 1:30 p.m. today.

“This replica will show the millions of visitors who come to Temple Square the beauty and majesty of this sacred and historic building,” said Elder Richard G. Hinckley, executive director of the Missionary Department. “Like all temples, once the building is dedicated it is used for sacred Church purposes and not open to the general public, but this exhibit will provide the public with a glimpse of the interior and a feeling of the Spirit that is present there.”

The Salt Lake Temple is a landmark known throughout the world.  When it was last open to the public in April of 1893, the local press reported that approximately 5,000 people, most of whom were not members of the Church, toured the temple before the dedication.  The reports went on to say that “altogether the richness and elegant workmanship of the temple was a revelation of wonder to the visitors.”

Extensive open houses have been held prior to the dedication of newly constructed temples throughout the world and allow visitors to walk through and experience the sacred structures. Once dedicated, temples are in continual, even daily, use by members of the Church for religious purposes. While public open houses for new temples regularly draw tens and even hundreds of thousands of people, millions will likely see this model of the Salt Lake Temple over its lifetime.

“Many people think our temples are like great halls or cathedrals. Actually, they have a number of rooms designed for certain functions such as marriages, baptisms and instructional sessions,” said Elder William R. Walker, executive director of the Church’s Temple Department.

The model of the Salt Lake Temple sits in front of a giant window in the South Visitors’ Center facing the actual building that it replicates. The south and east walls of the replica have been cut away to show depictions of many of the rooms in the temple, including the large assembly hall and rooms where the First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles meet. The baptistery and other ordinance rooms are also depicted. Close attention is paid to detail, and even paintings, furniture and working chandeliers and lamps imitate those found in the actual temple.

Peter McCann Architectural Models of Toronto was commissioned to create the replica last August. Sixteen modelers with different expertise in various parts of the duplication process worked on the project for five months. (Click here for fact sheet, photos and audio sound bites about the creation process).

“Some of the detail is so fine that we had to find people that were capable of doing it at that scale,” said Josh Coulas, manager of the project for Peter McCann Architectural Models.

In addition to the scaled model, the new display in the South Visitors’ Center features new kiosks that show high-definition photos and video of the Salt Lake Temple interior rooms. A narrator gives an explanation of the purpose of the rooms and a diagram shows where they are located on the model. The presentation is very similar to what a person would experience during the public open house of a temple.

“This new display will give people another reason to visit Temple Square for the first time or for the hundredth time,” said Elder Hinckley. “Because of its history and spiritual significance, this temple is beloved by millions and recognized as an icon of Mormonism throughout the world.”

Brigham Young designated the location for the Salt Lake Temple just days after the first group of pioneers came into the Salt Lake Valley. Construction began on the building in 1853 and was completed in 1893.

More than just a structure with a beautiful and functional design, the temple was central to the faith of the pioneers who settled the Salt Lake Valley. Latter-day Saint temples are considered houses of God, a place of holiness and peace separate from the preoccupations of the world. They provide a place where Church members make formal promises and commitments to God. They are also the place where the highest sacraments of the faith occur — the marriage of couples and the “sealing” of families for eternity.

Anyone, regardless of religion, may enter a Latter-day Saint meetinghouse and attend services. However, because of the sacredness of temples as “houses of the Lord,” only members of the Church who are in good standing are allowed to enter the temples. A member must be observing the basic principles of the faith and attest to that fact to his or her local leaders once every two years in order to enter a temple.

The Salt Lake Temple was the sixth temple built by the Church. Today there are 132 operating templesthroughout the world.


The model was built by Peter McCann Architectural Models of Toronto, Canada.

  • The model is 88 inches tall from temple base to the top of the spires. With the pedestal, the entire display is nearly 12 feet tall.

  • The model weighs somewhere between 600 and 800 pounds.

  • Each glass panel installed in the pedestal weighs 200 to 300 pounds.

  • A 16-member team constructed the model in five months, after several months of preparation.

  • Experts were brought in with specialized skills in model construction, including an electrical engineer and craftsmen who constructed the chandeliers, the structure, parts and interior paintings.

  • Materials used in the model include acrylic plastic, heavy card stock, brass, wood, gold leaf and glass.

  • The model was built in eight different sections. Each section is independent of each other.

Have Questions about the Salt Lake Temple Renovation? Find Answers to FAQ Here

Nauvoo News

As part of the Salt Lake Temple renovation announcement on April 19, 2019, President Russell M. Nelson of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said the Church will make every reasonable effort to honor and maintain the temple’s historic beauty.

“We will strive to preserve its reverent setting and character as originally directed by President Brigham Young,” President Nelson said. “We promise that you will love the results.”

Here are some questions and answers that will hopefully help those following the renovation of the Salt Lake Temple and Temple Square to better understand how the project will unfold in the coming years.

When will the Salt Lake Temple close?

The Salt Lake Temple will close on December 29, 2019.

How long will the Salt Lake Temple be closed?

The Salt Lake Temple will be closed for about four years. It is expected to reopen in 2024.

How will the renovation affect the plaza and other buildings on Temple Square?

The project will include the removal of the existing temple entry/annex, removal of the South Visitors’ Center, renovation of the historic Salt Lake Temple, construction of new temple entry buildings and visitors’ pavilions, and new hardscape and landscaping.

The plaza between State Street on the east and the Main Street Plaza will be repaired and refreshed with greater emphasis on the visitor experience and on the Savior.

West of the Main Street Plaza, the temple renovation and nearby site improvements will extend from North Temple to South Temple and from the Tabernacle to the Main Street Plaza.

There will still be access to the North Visitors’ Center, the Assembly Hall, the Salt Lake Tabernacle, and other buildings surrounding the Salt Lake Temple.

How much of Temple Square will be closed during the renovation, and what can I still visit?

Guests can still visit the Family History Library, Church History Museum, Church History Library, Conference Center, Salt Lake Tabernacle, North Visitors’ Center, Assembly Hall, Joseph Smith Memorial Building, Church Office Building, Relief Society Building, Administration Building, Beehive House, and Lion House.

Only the Salt Lake Temple, the South Visitors’ Center, and east plaza area will receive renovation attention.

During the renovation, the Church will closely coordinate pedestrian and vehicle traffic issues with Salt Lake City.

Tours by missionaries from the Temple Square Mission will continue to be available during construction.

How will the Temple Square renovation affect the annual tradition of Christmas lights?

Visitors will still be able to come and see Christmas lights, although it may be somewhat limited and smaller during the construction period.

How will this affect the Salt Lake Temple District?

Patrons who normally attend the Salt Lake Temple are encouraged to attend other nearby temples, including the Ogden, Bountiful, Jordan River, Draper, and Oquirrh Mountain Utah temples, although they may experience increased waiting. There are no plans to formally reassign any Latter-day Saint stakes to other temple districts during the closure.

What will be different about the sacred work of the Salt Lake Temple when the renovation is complete?

Following the renovation, the Salt Lake Temple will include live and film sessions.

The Salt Lake Temple currently has no ability to accommodate patrons who do not speak English. When the renovation is completed, the temple will be able to serve members who speak more than 86 different languages.

Where will the weekly meeting of the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles take place?

Administrative meetings held by Church leaders in the temple will be held in designated areas of the Joseph Smith Memorial Building.

Will there be an open house and rededication of the Salt Lake Temple when the renovation is finished?

Yes. When complete in 2024, the Church will host a public open house, and the Salt Lake Temple will be rededicated.

When was the last time the Salt Lake Temple underwent a major renovation?

The last major renovation of the Salt Lake Temple was in 1962. The temple closed on July 29 of that year for extensive renovation that included demolition of the old annex; cleaning of the exterior stone; replacement or upgrade of all mechanical systems, plumbing, wiring, carpeting, and light fixtures; reupholstering of furniture; and redecoration of the entire building. The temple reopened on May 21, 1963, according to ChurchofJesusChristTemples.org.

On March 7, 1963, the building that would later become the North Visitors’ Center was dedicated as a temporary annex.

A new annex built to house seven new sealing rooms, a children’s waiting room, mechanical systems, two new locker rooms, new initiatory areas, and a new chapel seating 450 patrons opened on March 19, 1966. This new annex was dedicated on October 23, 1967.

What will change/remain the same about the Salt Lake Temple’s exterior/interior?

The Church plans to preserve the historic aspects of the Salt Lake Temple’s exterior wall and hopes visitors will feel more welcomed to Temple Square.

The work of the project is a mix of preservation, restoration, renovation, and new construction.

All of the temple’s aging mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems will be replaced.

Extensive research has been undertaken regarding such things as soil composition, granite strength, concrete and plaster sampling, and vibration movement modeling, along with additional research in cooperation with the Church History Department on the historic aspects of the temple, including its original design and subsequent modifications. A detailed study of this research includes paint samples, murals, millwork, and furniture.

The renovation will include a significant seismic upgrade to help the temple withstand a large magnitude earthquake. A base isolation system will be installed.

The stone spires and walls will need to be strengthened.

As part of the project, a new access tunnel will be installed under North Temple Street. The tunnel will grant direct entry to the temple from the Conference Center parking area.

The renovation of the plaza east of the temple will make it more public and friendly, with seating areas and new corridors.

There will be times during the construction when scaffolding will cover the temple and nightly lighting will be reduced.

How will the renovation affect Temple Square activities, such as tours, weddings, parties, concerts, restaurants, and state tourism?

Tours by missionaries from the Temple Square Mission will continue to be available during construction, as will access to all the buildings surrounding the temple and plaza. Couples can still make marriage reservations until the temple is closed on December 29.

How much will the renovation cost?

The Church acknowledged the cost of the renovation will be significant but did not disclose a specific figure.

Who is doing the architecture and construction?

FFKR Architects and Jacobsen Construction.

Will there be any street closures?

No. The Church will coordinate closely with Salt Lake City to address any pedestrian and vehicle traffic concerns.

How much noise and dust will the renovation generate?

The project will involve scaffolding on the temple, multiple tower cranes, dust, and noise. The Church hopes to keep the dust to a minimum and comply with Salt Lake City noise ordinances.

How will the Church prevent what recently happened with Notre Dame from happening to the Salt Lake Temple?

The Church acknowledged the recent Notre Dame fire and understands how construction puts any project at greater risk for a fire. The Church plans to work closely with the contractor, Church risk management, and local fire officials to finalize a fire prevention plan.

Will the Tabernacle Choir still rehearse at the Salt Lake Tabernacle during the renovation?

The Tabernacle Choir at Temple Square will continue to use the Salt Lake Tabernacle but at times might move over to the Conference Center in coordination with the construction schedule. The Church emphasized that visitors will still be welcome to enjoy the Tabernacle.

BREAKING - Salt Lake Temple To Close with 4 Year Renovation

Nauvoo News

Details and project renderings have been released regarding the upcoming closure and renovation of the historic Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.




Church President Russell M. Nelson announced the pioneer-era temple will close December 29, 2019, and will remain closed for approximately four years while undergoing a major structural and seismic renovation. The temple is expected to reopen in 2024 with a public open house.

“This project will enhance, refresh, and beautify the temple and its surrounding grounds,” said President Nelson. “Obsolete systems within the building will be replaced. Safety and seismic concerns will be addressed. Accessibility will be enhanced so that members with limited mobility can be better accommodated.”

The surrounding area on Temple Square and the plaza near the Church Office Building will also be affected as existing buildings are demolished and the area undergoes renovation and restoration. The existing annex and temple addition on the north side, which were built in the 1960s to add needed support facilities and more sealing (marriage) rooms, will be demolished and rebuilt.

“The Salt Lake Temple is the center of Temple Square and the Church headquarters campus,” said Bishop Dean M. Davies, first counselor in the Church’s Presiding Bishopric. “New site improvements including multiple entry points will provide better access and views to the temple and through Temple Square. The new landscape will provide a pleasant atmosphere for all who visit Temple Square.”




Temple Improvements

The renovation of the temple will involve replacing the historic building’s aging mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems, as well as a significant seismic upgrade to help the building withstand a large-magnitude earthquake.

“This upgrade will include a base isolation system, which is one of the most effective means of protecting a structure against earthquake forces,” said Brent Roberts, managing director of the Church’s Special Projects Department. “This unique system will preserve the historic footing of the temple. Once complete, it will help protect people, the historic building, and the beautiful interior finishes in the event of an earthquake.”

The installation of the base isolation system will require deep excavations around the historic footings and foundation of the temple and will also require the strengthening of the stone spires and walls.

Patron Access

This project will also include the renovation of part of Temple Square. Portions of the wall around Temple Square will be opened and modified to allow more inviting views and better access to temple grounds. The existing South Visitors’ Center will be demolished and replaced with two new guest and visitor pavilions.

Following the renovation, temple patrons and guests will enter the temple through the new entry pavilions to the north and proceed down to a grand hall. The formal temple entry point (recommend desk) will sit underneath large skylights that will provide natural light and generous views of the temple above. Patrons will then proceed down the grand hall to the historic temple.

For temple patrons who enter from the Conference Center parking area, a new guest access tunnel will be built under North Temple Street that will allow for direct underground entry to the grand hall from the parking structure.





History

Construction of the Salt Lake Temple began in 1853 under the direction of Church President Brigham Young. The temple was dedicated 40 years later by Church President Wilford Woodruff on April 6, 1893. The temple has been renovated many times since its original dedication. The most extensive renovation took place from 1962 to 1966, during which new plumbing, electrical, heating and air conditioning systems were installed. An addition for sealing rooms was added to the north side of the temple, and the original temple annex was demolished with a new, larger annex constructed.

President Nelson spoke about the Salt Lake Temple renovation project in general conference on April 7, 2019. He said, “Efforts will be made to preserve the unique historicity of each temple wherever possible, preserving the inspiring beauty and unique craftsmanship of generations long-since passed.”

Visitor Experience

During the renovation, the Church will closely coordinate pedestrian and vehicle traffic issues with Salt Lake City. It is expected that the North Visitors’ Center, Tabernacle and Assembly Hall will remain open to the public during construction. Tours by missionaries from the Temple Square Mission will continue to be available for guests during construction.





“We will work diligently to maintain the regular functions of surrounding facilities and activities during our construction activities,” said Roberts. “We look forward to our continued coordination with Salt Lake City and many associated departments of Church headquarters in this historic renovation.”

Other Temple Square attractions that will be accessible to visitors during the temple renovation include the Family History Library, Church History Museum, Church History Library, Conference Center, Joseph Smith Memorial Building, Lion House and Beehive House.

“We promise that you will love the results,” said President Nelson. “They will emphasize and highlight the life, ministry, and mission of Jesus Christ in His desire to bless every nation, kindred, tongue and people.”






President Nelson's Personal Note of Sympathy to Pope Francis on Notre Dame

Nauvoo News

President Russell M. Nelson of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints wrote words of comfort and encouragement to Pope Francis in the wake of the devastating fire at the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, April 15, 2019.

In his letter, President Nelson expressed profound sadness at the damage done to this sacred structure that has stood for more than 800 years. President Nelson, the leader of a 16.3 million-member faith community, told the Bishop of Rome that his thoughts immediately went to him and the many beloved friends in the Catholic faith. He said he is heartbroken by the tragedy to such an ageless symbol of faith and shares his feelings of grief.

President Nelson said he prays Notre Dame will rise again in newness of life.

In March 2019, President Nelson and President M. Russell Ballard of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles visited Pope Francis at the Vatican in Rome, Italy, the day before President Nelson dedicated the Rome Italy Temple.

The Church’s Europe Area Presidency—Elder Paul V. Johnson, Elder Gary B. Sabin, and Elder Massimo De Feo—expressed sympathy to Michel Aupetit, archbishop of Paris. The Latter-day Saint leaders shared their hope both for the people of France and the entire Christian world that Notre Dame will be restored as a symbol of faith.

Other Church leaders penned a separate letter to Bishop Oscar A. Solis, appointed in 2017 by Pope Francis to lead the Diocese of Salt Lake City. President Ballard and Elder Ronald A. Rasband of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, along with Elder Craig C. Christensen of the Church’s Utah Area Presidency, expressed to Bishop Solis their deep sadness at the damage done to Notre Dame.

NEW: April 2019 General Authority Leader Chart - Download >>>

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS - Changes to Church leadership are reflected in a new chart of General Authorities and General Officers dated April 2019, available to view or download.

A new Sunday School General Presidency, 10 General Authority Seventies, and 55 Area Seventies were called and sustained during the 189th Annual General Conference on April 6.

President Dallin H. Oaks, First Counselor in the First Presidency, announced a new Sunday School General Presidency. Brother Mark L. Pace is the new president, with Brother Milton Camargo and Brother Jan E. Newman as his counselors.

Also announced were 10 new General Authority Seventies: Elder Rubén V. Alliaud, Elder Jorge M. Alvarado, Elder Hans T. Boom, Elder L. Todd Budge, Elder Ricardo P. Giménez, Elder Peter M. Johnson, Elder John A. McCune, Elder James R. Rasband, Elder Benjamin M. Z. Tai, and Elder Alan R. Walker.

View and download the PDF now. See the printed chart in the conference issue of the May Ensign and Liahona magazines.

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Rising from the Ashes: Why the Notre Dame Fire Is a Symbol of Rebirth during Holy Week

Nauvoo News

CHURCH NEWS - Stepping out of his front door near Paris’s Île Saint-Louise, Benjamin Poussard made his way toward the Pont de la Tournelle, a bridge crossing the Seine River. With plans to meet his wife to celebrate his birthday with a night out, he spotted smoke rising above the Île de la Cité, the island where the famous Notre Dame Cathedral sits at the heart of Paris.

“It was horrible,” Poussard said, describing how he watched flames engulf the roof of the city’s most-visited tourist attraction. “People from all over Paris were converged on bridges, watching the smoke rise.”

Realizing the magnitude of what was happening, Poussard rushed home to get his camera, returning to the site where crowds of people filled the streets and bridges surrounding the small island at the city center.

A member of the Paris Ward of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Poussard lives mere blocks from Notre Dame and said he could feel the heat from the flames as he stood some 200 yards away from the Catholic cathedral while snapping photos to send to the French media.

“I passed people crying in the streets. And I personally cried when I sent my pictures to the press,” Poussard said, his voice becoming strained with emotion. “That island is where Paris was born. It is the cradle of Paris.”

Read More . . .

President Russell M. Nelson: 'We Can Do Better and Be Better'

Dena Kennedy

President Russell M. Nelson, president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, speaks during the priesthood session of the 189th Annual General Conference on April 6, 2019

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“When Jesus asks you and me to 'repent,' He is inviting us to change our mind, our knowledge, our spirit — even the way we breathe. He is asking us to change the way we love, think, serve, spend our time, treat our wives, teach our children and even care for our bodies.”

Daily repentance is the pathway to purity, and personal purity can make one a powerful tool in God’s hands.

“Whether you are diligently moving along the covenant path, have slipped or stepped from the covenant path or can’t even see the path from where you are now, I plead with you to repent. Experience the strengthening power of daily repentance — of doing and being a little better each day.”

Brethren are to prayerfully seek and understand what stands in the way of their repentance. “Identify what stops you from repenting. And then change! Repent! All of us can do better and be better than ever before.”

The Lord needs men who put others’ welfare ahead of their own, who clearly hear the voice of the Spirit, who are sexually pure, who are eager to repent and who have a zeal to serve.

“I bless you to become those men. I bless you with the courage to repent daily and learn how to exercise full priesthood power. I bless you to communicate the love of the Savior to your wife and children and to all who know you. I bless you to do better and to be better. And I bless you that as you make these efforts, you will experience miracles in your life.”

Sister Sharon L. Eubank: 'Christ — the Light That Shines in Darkness'

Dena Kennedy

Sister Sharon Eubank, first counselor in the Relief Society general presidency, gives her address during the Sunday morning session of the 189th Annual General Conference on April 7, 2019

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To those who feel paralyzed with grief, who are "just so tired," who feel they don't fit the "traditional mold," who are splintering with questions or who feel they will never be good enough, Christ is the source of light, healing and rest.

"When tragedies overtake us, when life hurts so much that we can't breathe, when we've taken a beating like the man on the road to Jericho and been left for dead, Jesus comes along and He pours oil into our wounds, He lifts us tenderly up, He takes us to an inn, He looks after us."

Just as Christ made great efforts to reach out to all kinds of people — especially those who weren't traditionally accepted in society — He continues to reach out to every person today.

Sister Eubank reminds those who are weighed down and irritated with questions that "this isn't the stage in our eternal development where we have all answers. But it is the stage where we develop our assurance (or sometimes hope) in the evidence of things not seen. Assurance comes in ways that aren't always easy to analyze, but there is light in our darkness."

What is the key to reconnecting to the power of Jesus Christ when one's faith is flickering?

The answer: make Christ the center of your life.

"If you feel that the beacon of your testimony is sputtering and darkness is closing in, take courage," she said. "Keep your promises to God. Ask your questions. Patiently melt stone to glass. Turn to Jesus Christ who loves you still."


Elder Gerrit W. Gong: 'Good Shepherd, Lamb of God'

Dena Kennedy

Elder Gerrit W. Gong of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles gives his address during the Sunday afternoon session of the 189th Annual General Conference on April 7, 2019

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The Good Shepherd seeks, gathers and comes to His people.

“Our Good Shepherd calls us in His voice and in His name. He seeks, gathers, and comes to His people. Through His living prophet and each of us, He invites all to find peace, purpose, healing and joy in the fulness of His restored gospel and on His covenant path. ...”

“As we seek with real intent to follow Jesus Christ, inspiration comes to do good, to love God and to serve Him. As we study, ponder and pray; as we regularly renew sacramental and temple covenants; and as we invite all to come to His gospel and ordinances, we are hearkening to His voice.”

In seeking and gathering us, the Savior reaches out to the one and to the ninety-and-nine, often at the same time. “As we minister, we acknowledge the ninety-and-nine who are steadfast and immovable, even while we yearn after the one who has strayed. Our Savior seeks and delivers us out of all places, from the four quarters of the earth. …

“Today, our Savior desires that what we do and who we are becoming will invite others to come follow Him. Come find love, healing, connection and covenant belonging in Him, including in God’s holy temple, where sacred ordinances of salvation can bless all family members, thus gathering Israel on both sides of the veil.”

Christ also teaches how to minister in love.

“Our Good Shepherd cautions that shepherds in Israel must not slumber, nor scatter or cause the sheep to go astray, nor look our own way for our own gain. God’s shepherds are to strengthen, heal, bind up that which is broken, bring again that which was driven away, seek that which was lost.”

The Tabernacle Choir Hits No. 1 on Billboard Charts

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS - The Tabernacle Choir at Temple Square and Orchestra at Temple Square announced today that their latest album, Let Us All Press On: Hymns of Praise and Inspiration, took the No. 1 spot on Billboard’s Classical Traditional chart, marking the 13th time that an album from “America’s Choir” has earned the top honor.

“While being at the top of the Billboard charts is not new for the choir, we are always pleased when the work of these talented performers is well received by the public,” said Choir President Ron Jarrett. “We know that the music of the choir and orchestra can bring peace and healing to those who listen. Our desire is that this Let Us All Press On CD will bring those blessings to all who need them.”  

Let Us All Press On marks the first full-length album of hymns from The Tabernacle Choir in almost seven years. The album features 14 brand new tracks including beloved hymn classics like “All Creatures of Our God and King” and “More Holiness Give Me.” Contained on the album is also the hymn, “Our Prayer to Thee,” with text written by President Russell M. Nelson. President Nelson wrote the words in 2003, and it was first performed as a hymn in April of that same year at the general conference, where it was matched to a tune by composer Joseph Parry.

The Tabernacle Choir and Orchestra at Temple Square have a new album called Let Us All Press On. Album cover provided by Deseret Book.

“We are grateful for the response to this latest recording by the choir and orchestra,” said Mack Wilberg, music director of The Tabernacle Choir. “We gave the album the subtitle of ‘Hymns of Praise and Inspiration’ and our hope is that the recording’s music can provide the inspiration and uplift that so many are looking for in the world today.”

New rules about how Boy Scouts can recruit Latter-day Saints issued by church

Nauvoo News

SALT LAKE CITY — Beginning June 1, community-based Boy Scout packs and troops may begin recruiting boys from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, according to guidelines the church released Friday.

The church announced in May that it would implement a new worldwide initiative for children and youth beginning in January 2020 and discontinue its centurylong association with the Boy Scouts of America. No church units will sponsor any Scouting units after Dec. 31.

The faith's Priesthood and Family Department sent a list of four new instructions for the transition to general and local church leaders around the world.

First, boys are encouraged to remain in their Latter-day-Saint-sponsored Scouting unit through Dec. 31.

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Russia Releases Video Showing Arrest of Two Latter-day Saint Volunteers

Nauvoo News

NOVOROSSIYSK, Russia -- A New video has been released by the Russian state media showing the arrest of two volunteers for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on March 1, 2019.

Teaching religion is permitted only inside church buildings. Typical street or door-to-door proselytizing in not permitted, but Church meetings and lessons are legal.

The video clip shows not only the arrest but also shows Russian authorities going through belongings of the two volunteers. Their church teaching materials seem to be of interest to the police including copies of the Book of Mormon, and personal planners commonly used by Latter-day Saint missionaries.

2019 Nauvoo Pageant & British Pageant Dates

Nauvoo News

The 2019 Nauvoo Pageant preparations are underway.  The beautiful theatrical outdoor stage performance is put on each summer in beautiful Nauvoo, Illinois by a cast and crew of over 1,100 people. The legacy of early Latter-day Saints in Nauvoo is told through song, dance, music and acting. The Pageant season brings historical vignettes in Old Nauvoo and the 1840s Frontier Country Fair as a fun and exciting part of the pageant's pre-show activities.

Nauvoo Pageant Dates 2019:  July 9 August 3 (excluding Sundays and Mondays)

The 2019 Nauvoo Pageant season will feature two amazing musical productions:

The 2019 Nauvoo Pageant: Will be held on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays - telling the story of early Latter-day Saint Church members who first settled the City of Nauvoo in 1839. It's full of music, singing, funny moments and a few tear jerkers.  You'll love the entire performance.

The 2019 British Pageant, “Truth Will Prevail,” held on Wednesdays and Fridays, and tells the history of early Saints in the British Isles. With delightful music and acting that will touch your heart and put a smile on your face, you'll learn the true stories of some very amazing families that made the hard sacrifice to come to America and follow their faith.

Both the 2019 Nauvoo Pageant & the British pageants are based on actual journals and historic records from the 1800s.  You experience both traditional period music and dancing as well as amazing original music. Thousands visit Nauvoo each year to enjoy both performances.  While in Nauvoo your family can also take free wagin rides around the old Nauvoo historic town - experience period blacksmith and tin shops - visit the old Times & Seasons newspaper press or take you whole family to the Family living center for pioneer games and crafts: ALL FREE.

2019 is a great year to come see beautiful Nauvoo.  

FULL NAUVOO PAGEANT SCHEDULE:

2019: July 9 - August 3 (excluding Sundays and Mondays)

The Nauvoo Pageant will be presented on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday. The British Pageant will be presented on Wednesday and Friday.

1840s Frontier Country Fair starts at 7:00 p.m each evening & The Pageant performances begin
at 8:30 p.m.

ADMISSION: Admission is free. No ticket is required, and no reservation is necessary.



BREAKING NEWS - Russia Releases Held Latter-day Saint Volunteers

Nauvoo News

After being arrested and detained for weeks by local authorities in Russia, two young Latter-day Saint volunteers have been released and deported following a decision from Novorossiysk’s Primorsky District Court, which found the two volunteers guilty of violating Russia’s enter and exit rules on March 2.

One volunteer has been identified as Kole Brodowski, of Garden Grove, Calif. The second volunteer has been identified as David Udo Gaag of Bothell, Wash.

"The two volunteers detained in Novorossiysk, Russia have been released and have left the country," church spokesman Eric Hawkins said. "Elder Kole Brodowski, age 20, who was nearing the end of his service, will return home to California. Elder David Gaag, age 19, will return to the United States for a short time, receive any needed support, and then continue his service in a new mission."

Their arrest and detention on March 1 during a meeting at a Church meetinghouse in Novorissiysk made international news.

According to their attorney, Sergei Glizuntsa, as reported by Tass—Russia’s state-run news agency—the two young volunteers have had no complaints about the conditions of their detention.

Following the arrest, the president of the Russia Rostov-na-Donu Mission—where the two are assigned—traveled to Novorossiysk to visit the volunteers on Monday, March 4, and they were able to call home.

Since 2016, when Russia implemented an anti-terrorism law, Church missionaries in the country have been redesignated as volunteers and all proselytizing can only occur in houses of worship.

Two Latter-day Saint Volunteers in Russia enter their third week of detention

Nauvoo News




NAUVOO NEWS - It’s been over two weeks since volunteers for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints were arrested and detained in Russia, for allegedly teaching English without a license.

Shortly after being detained a Russian judge ruled the two young men were in violation of their Visas and ordered them deported. Today, Eric Hawkins, a spokesman for the church, stated there’s been no change in the status of the two volunteers, and they remain detained.

One volunteer has been identified as Kole Brodowski, of Garden Grove, Calif. The second volunteer has been identified as David Udo Gaag of Bothell, Wash.




Nauvoo News is monitoring the situation and will report any changes or updates.






Watch: Sheri Dew Gives Behind-the-Scenes Tour of Historic Photo

Nauvoo News

Sheri Dew, Chief Content Officer for Deseret Management Corporation, talks about what went on behind the scenes of the iconic photo of the First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles taken this week in Rome.

"This is an unprecedented moment," she said in a Church News video. "We know of no other time when the full First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve have been outside of the United States together, let alone at a temple dedication."




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