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Nauvoo News

Nauvoo News & Events features stories shared from members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints around the world.  This includes official Church news releases and contributed articles by Latter-day Saint authors - as well as events & stories from YOU.

Actors Invited to Audition for 2019 Nauvoo and British Pageant Core Cast

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS - The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is seeking professional-quality actors to audition for 21 core cast roles in the Nauvoo and British pageants, which will be performed on alternating nights in Nauvoo during the summer of 2019.

Twelve men's roles and nine women's roles are available, ages 20s through 60s. There is one role for a teenage boy. (Please note that cast members under 18 years of age will need to have a parent/guardian with them in Salt Lake City and Nauvoo for the duration of the rehearsals and performances.)

The core cast auditions will be held at the end of January and beginning of February. For more information or to sign up for an audition time, visit https://www.signupgenius.com/go/60b0e4ea5ad2fa6f49-2019.

For those who are not able to attend the auditions in person, please send an email to culturalarts@ldschurch.org for information about submitting a video audition.

Core cast rehearsals will be held in Salt Lake City in June 2019 and will move to Nauvoo, Illinois, on June 24. Performances for both pageants will be July 9 through August 3, 2019.

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Two Rare Historic Church Books Stolen From BYU Library

Nauvoo News

A self-proclaimed Latter-day Saint antiquities dealer pleaded guilty last week to stealing eight books and a historic picture from the Brigham Young University library.

Investigators discovered Orem resident Kevin Mark Ronald Schuwer visited the Harold B. Lee Library in Provo between September and November 2018, according to court documents.

During those visits, he checked out eight books valued at $300 each from the Special Collections section. A police report stated he initially told officers he only checked out six books.

READ MORE HERE

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When the Saints Left Nauvoo for the Rocky Mountains

Dena Kennedy

A Circular of The High Council. To the Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and to All Whom It May Concern. Nauvoo, 1846.

In late 1845, the leadership of the church had still not made a definitive decision on where the Saints would move. A variety of locations had been considered and several had become favorites. The publications of Lansford W. Hastings, John C. Fremont and others had been consulted and the Times and Seasons for November and December had suggested the Pacific coast would be their destination. But even as late as December 26 Brigham Young had written to Samuel Brannan in New York and indicated that the destination was still undecided. So it appears that in January 1846 not only did the general membership of the church not know for sure where they would be moving but church leadership was not certain either. But by January 20 the Nauvoo High Council issued this broadside stating that:

"We...embrace this opportunity to inform you, that we intend to send out into the Western country from this place, some time in the early part of the month of March, a company of pioneers...Our pioneers are instructed to proceed West until they find a good place to make a crop, in some good valley in the neighborhood of the Rocky Mountains..."

This is the first public announcement of the Mormons' intention to establish a settlement in the Great Basin rather than somewhere on the west coast. But less than two weeks later the plans for a March exodus had to be altered. On January 29 rumors began to circluate that state troops intended to arrest certain Mormons leaders. This along with a letter from Sam Brannan to Brigham Young suggesting that the federal government was planning to confiscate the saints' arms and prevent them from leaving, convinced the church leadership to leave immediately. So on February 4, 1846 the first wagons ferried across the Mississippi River and the evacuation of Nauvoo was on.

20 Stunning Photos of the Moroni Statue on Temples

Nauvoo News

This is a collection of what we feel are among the most stunning photos of the statue of Moroni.

All Sister Missionaries Now Have Option of Wearing Slacks

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS - Sister missionaries serving for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints now have the option to wear pants during regular missionary activities—including during normal training activities at missionary training centers.

The First Presidency updated the missionary dress and grooming guidelines for sister missionaries in a letter sent to local Church leaders dated December 20, 2018.

Sister missionaries should continue to wear dresses or skirts when attending the temple and during Sunday worship services, leadership and zone conferences, baptismal services, and missionary training center devotionals, according to the letter. In areas where for cultural reasons it is not acceptable for women (including sister missionaries) to wear dress slacks, sister missionaries may choose to wear ankle-length skirts for additional protection from extreme weather and vector-borne diseases such as Zika, dengue fever, West Nile virus, Lyme disease, and malaria, according to the letter.

The adjustment to dress standards, which takes effect immediately, was approved by the First Presidency and is primarily motivated by safety concerns, said Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and chairman of the Missionary Executive Council.

“Adjustments to the missionary dress and grooming standards have changed over time since the beginning of the Restoration of the gospel of Jesus Christ in 1830 and will continue to do so in the future,” said Elder Uchtdorf. “As we adapt these standards, we always carefully consider the dignity of the missionary calling to represent Jesus Christ; the safety, security, and health of our beloved missionaries; and the cultural sensitivities of the places where they serve.”

Sister Bonnie H. Cordon, Young Women General President and a member of the Missionary Executive Council, elaborated on the changes for sister missionaries.

“There are a lot of vector-borne diseases because of mosquitoes and ticks and fleas,” said Sister Cordon. “This helps the sisters to prevent any of those bites or at least minimizes them.”

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has given sister missionaries the option of wearing dress slacks in their work.

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The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has given sister missionaries the option of wearing dress slacks in their work.

Sister missionaries in roughly half of the Church’s missions have previously been wearing dress slacks during the wet seasons to help protect them from mosquito-borne viral diseases such as dengue fever, Chikungunya, and Zika. This latest change will allow all sister missionaries to do so year-round, based on their own discretion.

“This is truly optional,” said Sister Cordon. “The sisters can wear dresses, they can wear slacks, whatever will help them in their service as they’re out amongst the people.”

In addition to safety concerns, Sister Cordon said the change will help sister missionaries who serve in cold climates to stay warm. Wearing dress slacks will also make it easier for sister missionaries to ride bicycles.

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“Sister missionaries are amazing people,” said Sister Cordon. “We want to make sure that they’re protected.”

In missions where sister missionaries were not previously approved to wear dress slacks, the mission provides funds for young sister missionaries who entered a missionary training center before March 1, 2019, to purchase three to four pairs of dress slacks (or long skirts, as explained above).

Details of the revised missionary dress and grooming guidelines can be found online.

First Recorded Christmas in Church History

Nauvoo News

There are few details about the Christmas in the early days of the Church.

Christmas in early Church was not celebrated in the traditional gift-giving manner like today. It wasn't even a particularly festive occasion. It would be many years before English immigrants would introduce carols, yule logs, and presents into the Puritan like tradition of members of the Church.

Early American settlers were strongly against the “impure” practices of European sects - including Christmas celebrations. Massachusetts, in 1657 imposed a fine of five shillings or a jail term for idleness, feasting, or participating in any Christmas festivities. Even mince pies were prohibited in Connecticut because of the dish’s association with the Christmas season.

Members of the Church with mostly Calvinist and Methodist backgrounds did not totally abandon their religious upbringings, and thus there is no mention of Christmas in the “Journal History” of the Church until 1841. The first Christmas of the Latter-days was in Nauvoo at Willard Richard’s home. The Church recorder made this entry for December 25:

“Being Christmas, Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Orson Pratt, Wilford Woodruff, John Taylor and their wives, and Willard Richards spent the evening at Dr. Richard’s home; and after supper, Mr. Kimball gave each of the Twelve Apostles a fractional lot of land lying on the west side of his second addition to Nauvoo.”

The first recorded glimpse of a Christmas celebration was written on Christmas Day in 1843 by the Prophet Joseph Smith. The entry marks a new outlook among Latter-day Saints towards the day:

“This morning, about one o’clock, I was awoken by an English sister, Lettice Rushton, … accompanied by three of her sons, with their wives, and her two daughters, with their husbands, and several of their neighbors, singing, ‘Mortals, Awake With Angels Join,’ which caused a thrill of pleasure to run through my soul. All of my family and boarders arose to hear the serenade, and I felt to thank my Heavenly Father for their visit, and blessed them in the name of the Lord. They also visited my brother Hyrum, who was awakened from his sleep. He arose and went out of doors. He shook hands with and blessed each one of them in the name of the Lord, and said that at first he thought a cohort of angels had come to visit him, it was such heavenly music to him.”

Later in the day the Prophet wrote the following took place:

“A large party supped at my house, and spent the evening in music, dancing, etc. in a most cheerful and friendly manner.”

Since that time many of our traditions associated with Christmas bring to mind special foods that are served to friends and relatives. Yet there is no record that the Saints in Nauvoo prepared any uniquely Yuletide treats. Most likely a Christmas dinner would have consisted of the same items available during the rest of the winter. Households usually had in supply flour, sugar, potatoes, beans, corn, salt, and dried meats and fruits. Lacking precise measuring utensils, the housewives of Nauvoo were accustomed to adding a “pinch of salt” or a “handful of sugar.” Oven temperatures were tested by the feel of heat upon the hand, and baked bread had a certain look as well as texture when ready to be removed from the oven. A big favorite of early members was ice cream that they made from snow, sugar and a little flavoring. Candy was made from molasses; and currants were worked into delicious jellies and jams.

The Nauvoo Neighbor, the Saint’s weekly newspaper, ran recipes for such favorites as Admiral Peacock’s Pickle for Meat (“The beef, after lying in the pickle for ten weeks, has been found as good as if it had been salted three days and as tender as a chicken.”) Information on how to salvage frozen potatoes, the best method for fattening turkeys (they should be fed “soft bricks broken into pieces, with charcoal also broken and with six grains of corn per day”), and ways to preserve hams, apples, and sweet potatoes were popular front-page articles.

Citizens were also told correct cow milking procedures: “If you would obtain all the milk from the cow you must treat her with the upmost gentleness; she must not stand trembling under your blows nor under your threats. She may at times need a little chastisement, but at such times you need not expect all her milk.”

Other “recipes” included in the paper were intended to cure ills of the temperament:

“A complete cure for a terrible disorder of the mouth commonly called ‘Scandal’ :

“Take a good nature, one ounce; of an herb called by the Mormons ‘mind your own business,’ one ounce, to which add of the oil of benevolence, one drachim and of brotherly love, two ounces. You must mix the preceding ingredients with a little charity for others, and a few sprigs of ‘keep your tongue between your teeth.’ Let this compound be allowed to simmer for a short time in a vessel called circumspection, and it will be ready for use.

“Symptoms: The symptoms are a violent itching in the tongue and roof of the mouth when you are in company with a species of animals called ‘Gossips.’

“Applications: When you feel a fit of the disorder coming on, take a teaspoonful of the mixture, hold it in your mouth, which you must keep closely shut till you get home.”

In a more traditional sense citizens in Nauvoo might be treated to recipes such as potato pancakes, applesauce cake, ginger cookies, and rusk, a cornbread cereal. All recipes require the basic ingredients common in Nauvoo homes and have been adapted to modern-day ovens for New Era readers. However, today’s grocery prices may not correspond with those listed in the Nauvoo Neighbor. The going rates in St. Louis included cornmeal, 25 cents per bushel; ginger, 11 cents per pound; lard, 3 1/2 cents per pound; and dried apples, 50 cents per bushel.

Extra gingery cookies, very taterish pancakes, surprisingly moist cake, and super crunchy cereal will invoke the pioneer spirit in you, your friends, and your family.


Written by Mary Stout





Brigham Young’s Donut Recipe - "deliciously tasty"

Nauvoo News

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Brigham Young’s Donuts

This original recipe for buttermilk donuts was contributed by Sister Naomie Young Schettler, a granddaughter of Brigham Young. It was first made by Emily Partridge Young, Sister Schettler’s grandmother. A favorite with President Young, the donuts became so popular that they eventually were sold at the Zion’s Cooperative Mercantile Institution department store in Salt Lake City.

5 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 teaspoons ground nutmeg
2 cups buttermilk
2 large eggs, beaten
1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
6 tablespoons butter, melted
Oil, for frying
Granulated or powdered sugar, optional
Ground cinnamon, optional

Combine ingredients, kneading in enough flour to make a soft dough, not too sticky. Roll out and cut into doughnuts. Fry in deep, hot oil.

Nauvoo Gingerbread Cookie Recipe

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO GINGERBREAD COOKIES: Every year thousands of people visit the beautifully restored Nauvoo, Illinois. Missionary couples, give free tours of the various sites. They explain the history of the city and give demonstrations of some of the skills of the early Saints who helped the city flourish.

But among the sweetest stops you can make in old Nauvoo is at the Scovil Bakery where over 50,000 cookies a year are handed out. Here is a way to take old Nauvoo hime with you.


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Gingerbread Cookies

from the Scovil Bakery
Nauvoo, Illinois

1 cup sugar

1 cup molasses

3/4 cup oil or lard

1/2 cup hot water

2 eggs

1 teaspoon soda

1 heaping teaspoon ginger

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 cups whole wheat flour

4 cups white flour

  1. Combine, sugar, molasses, and oil. Add hot water, measuring it in same cup as molasses so that you get all molasses out of cup.

  2. Add eggs, then beat.

  3. Sift together remaining ingredients.

  4. Refrigerate dough for 1 hour, then roll out and cut with cookie cutters.

  5. Place on lightly greased cookie sheet and bake for 10 minutes at 350° F (180° C).

First Presidency 2018 Christmas Message

Dena Kennedy

NAUVOO NEWS - The First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has released a 2018 Christmas message:

Our Savior, Jesus Christ, offers to us four incomparable gifts—the capacity to love others, the ability to forgive, the blessing of repentance, and the promise of life everlasting. These four unique gifts will bring us more and more joy as we accept and act upon them. They were made possible because Jehovah condescended to come to earth as the baby Jesus. He was born of an immortal Father and a mortal mother. He was born in Bethlehem under the most humble of circumstances. His was the holy birth foreseen by prophets since the days of Adam. Jesus Christ is God’s transcendent gift—the gift of the Father to all of His children. We joyfully celebrate His birth this Christmas season.

TEMPLE SQUARE LIGHTS CHRISTUS TS

Church Releases Statement on Future of Each Pageant

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has made an announcement regarding which pageants will continue on and which ones will be effected by the new changes.

THE FOLLOWING IS AN OFFICIAL STATEMENT FROM THE CHURCH”

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is growing across the earth. As this occurs, local Church leaders and members are encouraged to focus on gospel learning in their homes and to participate in Sabbath worship and the Church’s supporting programs for children, youth, individuals and families. The goal of every activity in the Church should be to increase faith in the Lord Jesus Christ and to share His gospel message throughout the world. Local celebrations of culture and history may be appropriate. Larger productions, such as pageants, are discouraged.

As it relates to existing pageants, conversations with local Church and community leaders took place in October 2018 to appropriately end, modify or continue these productions. Below are the decisions the Church has made from those discussions:

  • The Nauvoo Pageant will continue with support from Church headquarters.

  • The Mesa Pageant will continue under area leadership in 2021 following the renovation of the Mesa Temple.

  • The British Pageant will continue every four years under area leadership. The next pageant will be in 2021.

  • The Hill Cumorah Pageant will end in 2020.

  • The Manti Pageant will end in 2019.

  • The Castle Valley Pageant is discontinued.

  • The Clarkston Pageant is discontinued.



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New Update - Church Announces Which Pageants to Continue

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has made an announcement regarding which pageants will continue on and which ones will be effected by the new changes.

THE FOLLOWING IS AN OFFICIAL STATEMENT FROM THE CHURCH”

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is growing across the earth. As this occurs, local Church leaders and members are encouraged to focus on gospel learning in their homes and to participate in Sabbath worship and the Church’s supporting programs for children, youth, individuals and families. The goal of every activity in the Church should be to increase faith in the Lord Jesus Christ and to share His gospel message throughout the world. Local celebrations of culture and history may be appropriate. Larger productions, such as pageants, are discouraged.

As it relates to existing pageants, conversations with local Church and community leaders took place in October 2018 to appropriately end, modify or continue these productions. Below are the decisions the Church has made from those discussions:

  • The Nauvoo Pageant will continue with support from Church headquarters.

  • The Mesa Pageant will continue under area leadership in 2021 following the renovation of the Mesa Temple.

  • The British Pageant will continue every four years under area leadership. The next pageant will be in 2021.

  • The Hill Cumorah Pageant will end in 2020.

  • The Manti Pageant will end in 2019.

  • The Castle Valley Pageant is discontinued.

  • The Clarkston Pageant is discontinued.

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Nauvoo Mercantile is Now on Pinterest

Nauvoo News

We would love to have you follow us on Pinterest. We just launched and have tuning up our Pinterest page and we are looking forward to adding new items every week.


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IF YOU FOLLOW US ON PINTEREST THIS WEEK

WE WILL SEND YOU A FREE GIFT LINK

THROUGH THE PRIVATE MESSAGE ON

PINTEREST.

The link will let you choose any 4-pack of these

beautiful greeting cards - we’ll even pay the

shipping


Minerva Teichert - Her Amazing Life in Photos & Art

Nauvoo News

This collection of photos & art tell an amazing story of Minerva Teichert’s life.

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EARLY LIFE

Minerva Bernette Kolhepp Teichert was an American artist beloved for her paintings of Mormon history and the great American west.  Although her Latter-day Saint art subjects are perhaps her most prominent work, her western paintings depicting scenes ranging from rodeos to American Indians are also highly collectible and sought after.

Minerva Teichert was born in August of 1888 in Ogden, Utah the second of ten children. Although she was born in Utah she grew up on a ranch in Idaho in what was as much a part of the American frontier as could be found in those days.  With much to do and much more to see, Minerva's mother gave her her first set of paints when she was only four years old. Without any formal education or training she set our on her favorite horse to paint and sketch the wild world around her.

At age 14, Minerva took a job in far way San Francisco as a nursemaid or what is known today as a nanny. It was a big move in her life - she was earning money, she saw an art museum for the first time in her life, and she began taking art lessons.  It wouldn't be long before she would earn enough money to travel east.

EDUCATION & FAMILY

Minerva Teichert studied art in Chicago at the Art Institute of Chicago.  Upon completion of her courses in 1912 she returned to Indian Warm Springs, Idaho to earn more money for art lessons.  During this time she began dating a young man named Herman Teichert.  However, Minerva was off again after saving up her money - she left Idaho & Herman behind in 1914 and traveled to New York.  Minerva studied at the Art Students League of New York, under renowned artist Robert Henri.  Henri, who was from Nebraska, was well acquainted with Mormons and wester American Indians.  He challenged Minerva to paint the Mormon experience.   Robert Henri gave Minerva a scholarship and ranked her among his best three students. Minerva paid for her schooling by sketching cadavers for medical schools. and illustrating children's books. 

Shortly after returning to Idaho, Minerva married Herman Adolph Teichert.  The couple had five children. Minerva spent most of her life with her family on a ranch in Cokeville, Wyoming.  She never lost her love of painting and although she didn't have the money to buy proper art supplies, she was able to sketch on scraps of wood and paper and paint from time to time. 

Minerva Teichert painted throughout her life, and her work can be seen in places ranging from museums and private collections to murals in remote Mormon chapels.  She once explained "I must paint", when asked how she was able to produce despite being almost isolated from the art world. She created beautiful works of art without a studio or even much free time. Minerva was a intelligent political conservative - she was a confident, independent, capable woman who stood up for many things including women's rights

MINERVA TEICHERT ART

Heroic men & women as well as American western themes would feature prominently in Minerva Teichert art.  Scene's of contrasting metaphors such Teichert's painting The Madonna of 1846. It depicts depicts a mother and child in a covered wagon, crossing the plains to settle in Utah.  Minerva Teichert painted over 400 murals in everything from public building and homes, to churches and Mormon Temples.  One of her larger commissions was a request to paint 42 murals from stories found in the Book of Mormon. 

 

 

Minerva Teichert art has a distinctive style that can be seen in most of her paintings today.  For example Teichert painted much of the clothing in her paintings with patterns, a detail unique to her paintings. She would also include the color red to add contrast. She often left the edges unfinished or just sketched. Many of her paintings are filled with the colors from the desert and feature distant mountains.

Teichert submitted many pieces of artwork to the church, but in several instances they were rejected, so, she gave the paintings to Brigham Young University to help pay tuition for members of her family.  Today, her works can be found on display all around the BYU campus. 

Towards the end of her life it became clear that her lifetime of art was a monumental contribution to not only the LDS Church historians, but just as much to the western art museums all around.  Minerva Teichert art has been featured in most church periodicals and manuals and to this day hangs framed or as murals in most LDS chapels and Temples throughout the world. Her legacy of strong heroic scenes has helped in documenting the the remarkable role women played in the early migrating days of the church, but in the settlement of the western United States.

Minerva Teichert was a life-long devoted member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Her faith influenced the subjects of much of her work. She served in various positions in the church, including Primary President. and Sunday School President. She also worked in the Young Women's organization.

Her husband, Herman, was not a member of the church when the couple was married. He supported her activity in the church and donated tithing. He was later baptized in 1933. The couple was sealed the following year in the Logan Utah Temple.

Minerva Teichert continued painting into her seventies but after a hip fracture, she stop painting. Leaving behind a unmatched scattering of amazing art she died in Provo, Utah, in 1976.

We are proud to carry Minerva Teichert art in our gallery in Nauvoo, Il and as part of this online gallery.

Minerva Teichert - Rescue of the Lost Lamb

Nauvoo News

Minerva Teichert - Rescue of the Lost Lamb painting was done in 1939 by the artist. Minerva was a student of art in New York City. She worked with other artists like Edward Hopper who encouraged her to paint “her church history and story using Mormon Art”.

Rescue of the Lost Lamb

Rescue of the Lost Lamb is among the most beloved of Minerva Teichert art. It depicts the biblical parable of the lost lamb. "What man of you, having an hundred sheep, if he lose one of them, doth not leave the ninety and nine in the wilderness, and go after that which is lost, until he find it? And when he hath found it, he layeth it on his shoulders, rejoicing. And when he cometh home, he calleth together his friends and neighbours, saying unto them, Rejoice with me; for I have found my sheep which was lost." (Luke 15:4-6).  This piece is printed on high quality Museum Giclee Canvas. 

Minerva Teichert Rescue of the Lost Lamb

Minerva Teichert Rescue of the Lost Lamb

Nauvoo Community Christmas Tree Lighting

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS: There were many gathered last night at the annual Nauvoo Community Christmas Tree lighting. Each year community members from around the Nauvoo area share an evening together in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ visitors center.

The festivities included a live Nativity scene, music provided by the Warsaw High School Jazz combo and Choir. There were also horse drawn wagon rides and refreshments.

Photos courtesy of Nauvoo News Editor - Brielle Hill

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First Presidency Christmas Broadcast - Ways to Watch

Nauvoo News

The First Presidency invites Church members and their friends to participate in the First Presidency’s Christmas devotional broadcast on Sunday, December 2, 2018, at 6:00 p.m. mountain standard time.

The program, originating from the Conference Center, will include Christmas messages by General Authorities and General Officers of the Church.

The Tabernacle Choir and Orchestra at Temple Square will provide the music.

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View live

The following options are available for viewing the devotional live:

Various other stations and internet sites throughout the world will also carry the devotional. Check local program listings for availability in your area.

Stake technology specialists

Stake technology specialists should refer to the Church broadcast schedule when it becomes available approximately three weeks before the event.

Tickets to live event

The event at the Conference Center in Salt Lake City, Utah, is free but tickets are required for admission. For ticket information, see the Temple Square Events page.

Social media sharing

To participate in conversations about the Christmas devotional on Twitter and other social media channels, use #ChristmasDevo.

Visit Nauvoo News on Facebook at: facebook.com/nauvoonews/

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Nauvoo Blanketed in Unusually Heavy Fog

Nauvoo News

Nauvoo News - The winter weather has brought a deep blanket of fog to Nauvoo. Although fog is not entirely uncommon for Nauvoo this cold weather typically doesn’t bring fog weather to the area.

Nauvoo, Illinois is mostly known as a place with warm and even hot weather in the mid too late summer. But the weather is typically pleasant most of the year.


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Live View of Christmas on Temple Square - Webcam

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS - Temple Square has a 24hr online live camera to get a glimpse of the holiday season. Hundreds of thousands of LED Christmas lights return to Temple Square in Salt Lake City Friday, November 23, 2018, at 5:30 p.m. The lights will be turned on every morning from 6:00 a.m. until 7:30 a.m. and from 5:00 p.m. until 10:30 p.m. every evening through January 2, 2019.

Christmas on Temple Square features several activities, including the Christmas lights, the First Presidency’s Christmas devotional, Tabernacle Choir Christmas concerts, musical performances, nativity displays and movies in the Joseph Smith Memorial Building Legacy Theater.

Christmas on Temple Square features several activities, including the Christmas lights, the First Presidency’s Christmas devotional, Tabernacle Choir Christmas concerts, musical performances, nativity displays and movies in the Joseph Smith Memorial Building Legacy Theater.

Temple Square Christmas Lights

Temple Square Christmas Lights


NAUVOO NEWS - Temple Square has a 24hr online live camera to get a glimpse of the holiday season. Hundreds of thousands of LED Christmas lights return to Temple Square in Salt Lake City Friday, November 23, 2018, at 5:30 p.m. The lights will be turned on every morning from 6:00 a.m. until 7:30 a.m. and from 5:00 p.m. until 10:30 p.m. every evening through January 2, 2019.

Christmas on Temple Square features several activities, including the Christmas lights, the First Presidency’s Christmas devotional, Tabernacle Choir Christmas concerts, musical performances, nativity displays and movies in the Joseph Smith Memorial Building Legacy Theater.


This year, the Legacy Theater will be showing four movies:

  • “Mr. Krueger’s Christmas”

  • “The Nativity: A Bible Story”

  • “Be One — A Celebration of the Revelation on the Priesthood”

  •  “Meet the Mormons”

A schedule of the showings can be found on LDS.org.

“Mr. Krueger’s Christmas” is a television special that was produced by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1980. It stars Jimmy Stewart and The Tabernacle Choir at Temple Square.

“The Nativity” is a short movie that revisits scenes from the events surrounding the birth of Jesus Christ.

“Be One — A Celebration of the Revelation on the Priesthood” is a recording of the 40th anniversary celebration of the revelation on the priesthood that took place on June 1, 2018.

“Meet the Mormons” is a series of vignettes examining the diverse lives of devout members of the Church.


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Salt Lake Temple Built of Legos - Time Lapsed

Dena Kennedy

BYU - This is a great time lapsed video of an impressive Salt Lake Temple built using legos.