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Nauvoo News

Nauvoo News & Events features stories shared from members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints around the world.  This includes official Church news releases and contributed articles by Latter-day Saint authors - as well as events & stories from YOU.

2019 Nauvoo Pageant & British Pageant Dates

Nauvoo News

The 2019 Nauvoo Pageant preparations are underway.  The beautiful theatrical outdoor stage performance is put on each summer in beautiful Nauvoo, Illinois by a cast and crew of over 1,100 people. The legacy of early Latter-day Saints in Nauvoo is told through song, dance, music and acting. The Pageant season brings historical vignettes in Old Nauvoo and the 1840s Frontier Country Fair as a fun and exciting part of the pageant's pre-show activities.

Nauvoo Pageant Dates 2019:  July 9 August 3 (excluding Sundays and Mondays)

The 2019 Nauvoo Pageant season will feature two amazing musical productions:

The 2019 Nauvoo Pageant: Will be held on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays - telling the story of early Latter-day Saint Church members who first settled the City of Nauvoo in 1839. It's full of music, singing, funny moments and a few tear jerkers.  You'll love the entire performance.

The 2019 British Pageant, “Truth Will Prevail,” held on Wednesdays and Fridays, and tells the history of early Saints in the British Isles. With delightful music and acting that will touch your heart and put a smile on your face, you'll learn the true stories of some very amazing families that made the hard sacrifice to come to America and follow their faith.

Both the 2019 Nauvoo Pageant & the British pageants are based on actual journals and historic records from the 1800s.  You experience both traditional period music and dancing as well as amazing original music. Thousands visit Nauvoo each year to enjoy both performances.  While in Nauvoo your family can also take free wagin rides around the old Nauvoo historic town - experience period blacksmith and tin shops - visit the old Times & Seasons newspaper press or take you whole family to the Family living center for pioneer games and crafts: ALL FREE.

2019 is a great year to come see beautiful Nauvoo.  

FULL NAUVOO PAGEANT SCHEDULE:

2019: July 9 - August 3 (excluding Sundays and Mondays)

The Nauvoo Pageant will be presented on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday. The British Pageant will be presented on Wednesday and Friday.

1840s Frontier Country Fair starts at 7:00 p.m each evening & The Pageant performances begin
at 8:30 p.m.

ADMISSION: Admission is free. No ticket is required, and no reservation is necessary.



BREAKING NEWS - Russia Releases Held Latter-day Saint Volunteers

Nauvoo News

After being arrested and detained for weeks by local authorities in Russia, two young Latter-day Saint volunteers have been released and deported following a decision from Novorossiysk’s Primorsky District Court, which found the two volunteers guilty of violating Russia’s enter and exit rules on March 2.

One volunteer has been identified as Kole Brodowski, of Garden Grove, Calif. The second volunteer has been identified as David Udo Gaag of Bothell, Wash.

"The two volunteers detained in Novorossiysk, Russia have been released and have left the country," church spokesman Eric Hawkins said. "Elder Kole Brodowski, age 20, who was nearing the end of his service, will return home to California. Elder David Gaag, age 19, will return to the United States for a short time, receive any needed support, and then continue his service in a new mission."

Their arrest and detention on March 1 during a meeting at a Church meetinghouse in Novorissiysk made international news.

According to their attorney, Sergei Glizuntsa, as reported by Tass—Russia’s state-run news agency—the two young volunteers have had no complaints about the conditions of their detention.

Following the arrest, the president of the Russia Rostov-na-Donu Mission—where the two are assigned—traveled to Novorossiysk to visit the volunteers on Monday, March 4, and they were able to call home.

Since 2016, when Russia implemented an anti-terrorism law, Church missionaries in the country have been redesignated as volunteers and all proselytizing can only occur in houses of worship.

Two Latter-day Saint Volunteers in Russia enter their third week of detention

Nauvoo News



NAUVOO NEWS - It’s been over two weeks since volunteers for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints were arrested and detained in Russia, for allegedly teaching English without a license.

Shortly after being detained a Russian judge ruled the two young men were in violation of their Visas and ordered them deported. Today, Eric Hawkins, a spokesman for the church, stated there’s been no change in the status of the two volunteers, and they remain detained.

One volunteer has been identified as Kole Brodowski, of Garden Grove, Calif. The second volunteer has been identified as David Udo Gaag of Bothell, Wash.



Nauvoo News is monitoring the situation and will report any changes or updates.





Watch: Sheri Dew Gives Behind-the-Scenes Tour of Historic Photo

Nauvoo News

Sheri Dew, Chief Content Officer for Deseret Management Corporation, talks about what went on behind the scenes of the iconic photo of the First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles taken this week in Rome.

"This is an unprecedented moment," she said in a Church News video. "We know of no other time when the full First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve have been outside of the United States together, let alone at a temple dedication."




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Two New Photos - First Presidency & Quorum of Twelve Apostles

Nauvoo News

Every member of the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, dressed in white temple clothing, posed for an iconic photograph in the Rome Italy Temple Visitors' Center in Rome, Italy on Monday, March 11, 2019. Front center are President Russell M. Nelson and his counselors in the First Presidency, President Dallin H. Oaks and President Henry B. Eyring. Also included are members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles: President M. Russell Ballard, Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf, Elder David A. Bednar, Elder Quentin L. Cook, Elder D. Todd Christofferson, Elder Neil L. Andersen, Elder Ronald A. Rasband, Elder Gary E. Stevenson, Elder Dale G. Renlund, Elder Gerrit W. Gong and Elder Ulisses Soares.Photo: Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

 

Prophet Meets Pope Francis at the Vatican

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS - President Russell M. Nelson of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints met with Pope Francis inside the Vatican Saturday, the first meeting between a Latter-day Saint president and a pope. The visit comes a day before President Nelson dedicates the Church’s first temple in Rome. President Nelson was joined by President M. Russell Ballard of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

Following the 33-minute meeting, President Nelson and President Ballard met with members of the media. "We had a most cordial, unforgettable experience. His Holiness, he was most gracious and warm and welcoming," said President Nelson. He continued, "What a sweet, wonderful man he is, and how fortunate the Catholic people are to have such a gracious, concerned, loving and capable leader."

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President Nelson said, "We talked about our mutual concern for the people who suffer throughout the world and want to relieve human suffering. We talked about the importance of religious liberty, the importance of the family, our mutual concern for the youth of the Church, for the secularization of the world and the need for people to come to God and worship Him, pray to Him and have the stability that faith in Jesus Christ will bring in their lives."

According to President Ballard, they spoke of the close relations the two faiths have in working together on humanitarian projects. "We explained to His Holiness that we work side by side, that we have projects with Catholic Relief Services all over the world in over 43 countries. [We've] been shoulder to shoulder as partners in trying to relieve suffering. He was very interested in that."

Elder Alessandro Dini-Ciacci, a local leader in Rome, also attended the meeting. "How inspiring it was for me to witness two of the leaders of the leading faiths in the world meet together and share brotherhood," he said. "This is beautiful to witness and something we can sure learn from in our association with people of other faiths." Elder Massimo De Feo of the Seventy was present and said the leaders immediately connected. "It was a wonderful feeling to see how they seemed to be like old friends after a minute. President Nelson and Pope Francis share so much love and mutual respect for each other."

Interfaith dialogue has been a practice of Latter-day Saint leaders from the founding days of the faith. Since becoming leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 2018, President Nelson has engaged with Roman Catholic prelates during several of his ministry stops. In Texas last November, he met with Archbishop Gustavo Garcia-Siller of the Catholic Archdiocese of San Antonio. And last month in Arizona, he spoke to Most Rev. Thomas J. Olmsted, Catholic Bishop of Phoenix. President Nelson has engaged in similar outreach many times in his 35 years of service as an apostle, traveling to more than 130 countries to minister to Latter-day Saints and friends of the faith.

President Nelson was interviewed in October 2018 by Sergio Rubin, the biographer of Pope Francis, during a ministry stop in Uruguay. President Nelson and Mr. Rubin briefly discussed the Rome Italy Temple. “We appreciate the kindness of the pope and the Vatican. They are most gracious in welcoming us,” the prophet said at the time.

Past interfaith dialogue between Catholics and Latter-day Saints at the Vatican includes President Henry B. Eyring (a counselor to the late Church President Thomas S. Monson) shaking hands with Pope Francis during a Vatican summit on marriage. In 2010, President Ballard visited Catholic leaders at the Vatican. In 1995, then-president Gordon B. Hinckley gave a copy of the Encyclopedia of Mormonism to the Vatican Library.

Catholic and Latter-day Saint leaders have also met in many other places. For example, in 2010 the late Cardinal Francis George (1937–2015), then the leader of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), spoke at Brigham Young University and met with Latter-day Saint apostles. More recently, apostles have discussed issues of common ground with Cardinal Timothy Dolan, archbishop of New York. And several Catholic leaders have made visits to Utah. This includes Archbishop Joseph Kurtz of Louisville (then the president of the USCCB), who visited Temple Square in 2016, and Archbishop Charles J. Chaput of Philadelphia, who has spoken at Brigham Young University several times. In 2015, Archbishop Chaput invited Elder D. Todd Christofferson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles to share principles Latter-day Saints employ to strengthen families during the World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia.

In Utah, the Church has cultivated a strong relationship in recent decades with the Roman Catholic Diocese of Salt Lake City. President Ballard and Elder Christofferson joined Catholics in Utah for the installation of Bishop Oscar A. Solis, who was appointed by Pope Francis in 2017 to lead Catholics in Utah. “Latter-day Saints cherish the long-standing friendship we have developed with the Catholic community in Utah and around the world,” President Ballard said at the time. President Ballard also attended the installation mass for Archbishop John C. Wester in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Archbishop Wester, Bishop Solis’s predecessor, was the Catholic bishop in Utah for eight years.

First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles - All Going to Rome

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS - President Russell M. Nelson of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints will dedicate the Rome Italy Temple Sunday, March 10, 2019. Unlike most temple dedications, Rome will feature three days of dedicatory services (seven sessions in all) so more Latter-day Saints in the area can participate in these special proceedings. Also, the entire First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles will be together in Rome. This is believed to be the first time in Church history that all 15 leaders have gathered in one location outside the United States.

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“A temple is literally a house of the Lord. Each temple is a holy sanctuary in which sacred ceremonies and ordinances of the gospel are performed by and for the living and also in behalf of the dead,” President Nelson says to introduce a new virtual tour of the Rome Italy Temple. “We build temples so our faithful members can visit often and receive the most sacred ordinances of our faith. Before our temples are dedicated for their sacred purpose, the public is invited to see the beauty of the temple and learn about the commitments we make there with God.”

Why is so much attention being given to the Church’s temple in Rome? At the Rome Temple media day in January, Elder David A. Bednar (chairman of the Church’s Temple and Family History Department) explained the faith’s global makeup and mindset. He also recognized that Rome is one of the most historic locations in the world, a city rich in biblical history, where the ancient apostles Peter and Paul preached the gospel of Jesus Christ.


“This is a worldwide religion," Elder David A. Bednar said of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. "We have more than 16 million members and the Church is recognized and established in over 170 nations, so it’s only a matter of time before we have temples in most major cities in the world, but it is of particular significance to have a temple in Rome, the Eternal City.”

At the same news conference, held in front of the vibrant, Christ-focused stained-glass window inside the temple visitors’ center, Elder Massimo De Feo spoke of Rome’s place in the history of Christianity.

“As the center for Christianity for millennia, Rome couldn’t be without a temple dedicated to Jesus Christ," said Elder De Feo, a General Authority Seventy and native of Italy. "Rome is also the Eternal City. We needed to have a temple in the Eternal City because it is a symbol of eternity. The temple is the place we learn that life is eternal.”

The Church’s temples differ from churches where members meet for Sunday worship services. Temples are considered “houses of the Lord” where the teachings of Jesus Christ are reaffirmed through marriage, baptism and other ceremonies that unite families for eternity.

Prior to the dedicatory services that take place Sunday through Tuesday, President Nelson will lead a Saturday evening devotional for local youth, which will emphasize the importance Latter-day Saints place on temples.

The Rome Italy Temple will serve over 23,000 Church members living in Italy and in neighboring countries. Currently there are more than 160 operating temples worldwide, including 14 in Europe.




Russia to Release Latter-day Saint Volunteers - UPDATE

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS - Sergey Gliznutsa, a Russian lawyer representing the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ volunteer Kole Brodowski told news organizations on Thursday that the volunteers will be released and deported next week in accordance with a ruling issued on Thursday by a court in Krasnodar.

Gliznutsa said “because most government offices are closed in Russia on Friday for national holidays, the court's decision would only be sent to the detention center where the men are being held, in the city of Gulkevichi on Monday at the earliest.” He said “it will likely take a couple days for the prison authorities to prepare the documents for the men's transfer out of the country.” Gliznutsa said he expected them to leave Russia on Wednesday or Thursday, but was unable to confirm the date.

The two young men are being held after being arrested in a Latter-day Saint church meeting house in Novorossiysk, a city on the Black Sea. They were accused of teaching an English class without a permit.

Initial reports of their arrest and detainment set off a firestorm of international concern for the two young men in light of growing tensions between the United States and Russia. In a Saturday March, 2nd court hearing, in which the volunteers were represented by attorneys provided by the church, the two sides were not able to resolve the issue and so the youths remained behind bars.




NEW UPDATE: Regarding Latter-day Saint Volunteers In Russian Custody

Nauvoo News

3:30pm EST - Thursday March, 7, 2019. BREAKING

NAUVOO NEWS - Sergey Gliznutsa, a Russian lawyer representing the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ volunteer Kole Brodowski told news organizations on Thursday that the volunteers will be released and deported next week in accordance with a ruling issued on Thursday by a court in Krasnodar.

Gliznutsa said “because most government offices are closed in Russia on Friday for national holidays, the court's decision would only be sent to the detention center where the men are being held, in the city of Gulkevichi on Monday at the earliest.” He said “it will likely take a couple days for the prison authorities to prepare the documents for the men's transfer out of the country.” Gliznutsa said he expected them to leave Russia on Wednesday or Thursday, but was unable to confirm the date.

The two young men are being held after being arrested in a Latter-day Saint church meeting house in Novorossiysk, a city on the Black Sea. They were accused of teaching an English class without a permit.

Initial reports of their arrest and detainment set off a firestorm of international concern for the two young men in light of growing tensions between the United States and Russia. In a Saturday March, 2nd court hearing, in which the volunteers were represented by attorneys provided by the church, the two sides were not able to resolve the issue and so the youths remained behind bars.


EARLIER NEWS RELEASES:


UPDATED DETAILS: It was confirmed by the United States State Dept. that the Russian police did in fact arrest two Latter-day Saint volunteers while they were at a church meetinghouse on Friday. According to a Church spokesman the authorities continue to detain them in Novorossiysk, a city on the Black Sea.

Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova confirmed the detention of Americans. “We can confirm information about the detention of a few US citizens," Maria Zakharova said when asked about reports of the detention of two members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

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"While we are grateful these young men are reportedly in good condition and are being treated well, we are troubled by the circumstances surrounding their detention," said Eric Hawkins, spokesman for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. "They have both spoken to their parents. We will continue to work with local authorities and encourage the swift release of these volunteers."

The father of one volunteer said “the two young men are doing well. The mission president traveled to Novorossiysk and is meeting daily with them.” On Monday, the mission president, where the young volunteers are serving, was allowed to bring his cellphone into where the boys are being held and have them call home.”

The father went on to say: "We’re doing a little better. We talked with the elders, with our son, yesterday, last night. … It was such a relief and so nice. It was really, really a sweet moment. I think he is fine. He told us that they are fine. They’re getting food." He said “a Saturday court hearing, in which the volunteers were represented by attorneys provided by the church, did not resolve the issue.” An agreement to have the two volunteers surrender their visas and leave the country was sought but no agreement has been made yet.

The father said officials believed the volunteers were teaching English without a license. The volunteers said they only were conducting a regularly scheduled game night in English.

U.S. STATE DEPARTMENT RESPONSE:

"We are aware of reports of two U.S. citizens detained in Novorossiysk, Russia," according to State Department spokesperson. "We have no higher priority than the protection of U.S. citizens abroad. Due to privacy considerations, we do not have any additional information at this time."

In 2016 Russia Government enacted an anti-terrorism law that banned public missionary work. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints immediately complied. Young missionaries were designated as volunteers and directed to follow the law's provision that all proselytizing take place in houses of worship.


Missionaries Detained - Russian Gov't Says No Longer Missionaries

Nauvoo News

BREAKING 3:30 Eastern Time:

NAUVOO NEWS - Sergey Gliznutsa, a Russian lawyer representing the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ volunteer Kole Brodowski told news organizations on Thursday that the volunteers will be released and deported next week in accordance with a ruling issued on Thursday by a court in Krasnodar.

Gliznutsa said “because most government offices are closed in Russia on Friday for national holidays, the court's decision would only be sent to the detention center where the men are being held, in the city of Gulkevichi on Monday at the earliest.” He said “it will likely take a couple days for the prison authorities to prepare the documents for the men's transfer out of the country.” Gliznutsa said he expected them to leave Russia on Wednesday or Thursday, but was unable to confirm the date.

The two young men are being held after being arrested in a Latter-day Saint church meeting house in Novorossiysk, a city on the Black Sea. They were accused of teaching an English class without a permit.

Initial reports of their arrest and detainment set off a firestorm of international concern for the two young men in light of growing tensions between the United States and Russia. In a Saturday March, 2nd court hearing, in which the volunteers were represented by attorneys provided by the church, the two sides were not able to resolve the issue and so the youths remained behind bars.



EARLIER NEWS POST

NAUVOO NEWS: Today, Russian government officials denied any knowledge of detaining two Americans who were serving as volunteers of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  However, the Church has confirmed the two men were arrested Friday during a church meeting in Novorossiysk, approximately 1,000 miles south of Moscow.

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In 2016 Russia officially banned religious missionaries under a counterterrorism law.  This new law has led to a troubling crackdown on Jehovah Witnesses and other groups that tract and preach their religious views.   The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said it is in compliance with the new law.  The church officially registers local workers as "volunteers," rather than missionaries. 

The father of one of the boys, Kyle Brodowski  stated that his son Kole was “one of the two Latter-day Saint volunteers detained by Russian security.”  Church spokesman Eric Hawkins said in a statement released on Tuesday, that the two volunteers had been arrested on Friday.

"Please pray for our Son and his companion," Kyle Brodowski, of Garden Grove, California, said in a Facebook post.

The second detained church member has not yet been identified. The church further stated “both volunteers are believed to be in good condition” and that the church would "continue to work with local authorities and encourage the swift release of these volunteers."

But on Wednesday, Russian President Vladimir Putin's spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters in Moscow, "I don't have this information," when asked about the purported arrests. He told journalists to contact the "relevant authorities" for more information.  Russia has acknowledged that it is holding two U.S. nationals, one over alleged espionage and another on fraud charges.  But it was unclear yet if he was referring to the church volunteers.

In April 2017, the Russian Supreme Court classified the Jehovah’s Witnesses as an “extremist organization.” This ruling put the country’s 170,000 officially pacifist Christian members on a par with the Islamic State militant group and neo-Nazi movements. The court not only banned the Jehovah’s Witnesses from operating anywhere in the country, but accepted a request from the justice ministry that they be considered an extremist group. This prompted the closure of the Jehovah Witness Russian headquarters.

Since then, the government has closed all of the 395 Jehovah’s Witness prayer halls, confiscated the group’s property and has banned its translation of the Bible, which uses the word “Jehovah” in place of “God” or “Lord.” Analysts at the United Nations warned that the Supreme Court ruling signaled a “dark future” for religious freedom in Russia.


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Changes to Emphasize the Correct Name of the Church of Jesus Christ

Dena Kennedy

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The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the name of the Church Latter-day Saints believe came by revelation from the Lord Jesus Christ Himself (see Doctrine and Covenants 115:4). “Jesus Christ directed us to call the Church by His name because it is His Church, filled with His power,” President Russell M. Nelson has said.

The Church is now making changes to many of its communication channels to reflect the faith’s full name and better convey commitment to follow Jesus Christ. More than getting the name right as an institution, the invitation to use the full name of the Church is an opportunity for Latter-day Saints to refocus their lives on the living Christ.

“Every day we should ask ourselves, ‘How can we better live as Jesus Christ taught and lived?’” President Nelson said. “This mindset will help fill our lives, our homes, our neighborhoods, and our churches with more of Christ’s light and power.”

The changes the Church is making apply to many aspects of Church communications. Four areas are of note for Latter-day Saints and the general public:

Websites: The Church’s official website will become ChurchofJesusChrist.org. This change is effective today, March 5, 2019, when the domain name ChurchofJesusChrist.org begins pointing to the LDS.org home page. In the coming months, the ChurchofJesusChrist.org domain name will replace what were the following:

  • LDS.org (ChurchofJesusChrist.org)

  • MormonNewsroom.org (Newsroom.ChurchofJesusChrist.org)

Eventually, Mormon.org will be incorporated into the new domain as well. However, because its primary audience is those outside the Church, merging it with the Church member-focused ChurchofJesusChrist.org will take more time.

Work is underway to unify and restructure all these websites into a new, more cohesive and personalized experience under the ChurchofJesusChrist.org domain. Until that time, Mormon.org will change to ComeuntoChrist.org.

Social media: Several Church social media accounts will consolidate and give greater emphasis to the name of the Savior’s Church. These social media channels will publish content more focused on living and sharing the gospel of Jesus Christ.

  • A new Facebook group has been established to build community and better inform individuals about Church news and updates. This group is called “The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints—Inspiration and News.” This group is designed to be a place of community and connection for Latter-day Saints.

  • The Church’s Twitter account display name will continue to be called “The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints” with the username of @ChurchNewsroom and will be the primary source on social media for news from the Church.

Mobile Apps: Many of the Church’s mobile apps will be renamed to align with recent direction from Church leaders regarding the naming of Church products.

  • LDS Music becomes “Sacred Music”

  • The Gospel Library app keeps the same name

Email Domain: The email addresses of all Church employees, general Church leaders and many volunteers will begin using the @ChurchofJesusChrist.org domain instead of the current @ldschurch.org. Like other changes, this adjustment is intended to help keep the name of Jesus Christ prominent in all the Church does.

Much work remains, particularly as the Church make changes to products in numerous languages throughout the world. The First Presidency asks Latter-day Saints and others “to be patient and courteous as changes are made.” 

A History of the Name of the Church

Latter-day Saint scripture and history show that getting the Church’s name right has been an evolving process from the faith’s earliest days. In the Book of Mormon, for example, Christ’s disciples could not agree on what to call the Church. Christ’s answer was to “take upon you the name of Christ.” In 1830 the Church was organized as the Church of Christ. The Church adopted a resolution in 1834 to change the name to the Church of the Latter Day Saints to distinguish it from other Christian denominations of the time. Then in 1838, the Lord Jesus Christ revealed to Joseph Smith that the name of the Church is to be the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Over the years, the Church standardized the spelling and hyphenation of its name, making it The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, as it is used today.

Since the first year of the Church’s founding, critics and others have sought to call the Church and its followers by other names — names Latter-day Saints used out of convenience at first but then came to embrace themselves. It’s hard work to undo nearly 189 years of history, culture and practice. But with God the impossible is possible. As President Nelson made clear in August 2018, “we have work before us to bring ourselves in harmony with [God’s] will.” Church leaders understand that this is a complex, multifaceted effort.

source: mormonnewsroom.com

Nauvoo Pioneer Exodus Commemoration - Over 400 Attend

Jenny Anderson

NAUVOO NEWS: On Saturday, February 2, 2019, over 400 people attended the annual commemoration of the pioneer exodus from Nauvoo that commenced on February 4, 1846.

The relatively balmy winter temperatures provided a perfect setting for the day’s events. Participants started the day at the Family Living Center, where they enjoyed a continental breakfast with hot chocolate and cider. President Mark Lusvardi, the Illinois Nauvoo Mission president, welcomed everyone to Nauvoo, after which Susan Sims, the area public affairs director, gave remarks reminding all present of the sacrifices of the pioneers and why the commemoration was important.

In 2002, President Hinckley rededicated the Nauvoo Temple and encouraged members to walk the Trail of Hope to the Mississippi River.

The crowd then exited the building to participate in the walk down Main and Parley Streets to the Mississippi River. The Nauvoo Legion, marching to the beat of a solitary drummer, led the way, followed by others carrying flags representing many of the nationalities of those who lived in Nauvoo in the 1840s. Teamsters with wagons were next in line, with missionaries, members, and visitors walking right behind. Parade members wore name tags bearing the names of pioneer ancestors to honor them in their march.

The commemoration culminated on the banks of the Mississippi River where Ben Pykles, curator of Church historical sites, delivered a short address. He spoke of the legacy the pioneers left for us today and quoted the following from the May 1842 Times and Seasons newspaper: “Our children will rise up and call us blessed; and generations yet unborn will dwell with peculiar delight upon the scenes that we have passed through, the privations that we have endured; the untiring zeal that we have manifested; the insurmountable difficulties that we have overcome in laying the foundation of a work that brought about the glory and blessings which they will realize.”

What a thrill it is to see the fulfillment of that prophecy.

Members and missionaries walk down Main and Parley Streets in Nauvoo on February 2, 2019, to commemorate the 1846 Nauvoo Exodus. The flags represent many of the nationalities of those who lived in Nauvoo in the 1840s. Photo courtesy of Bruce Cornwell.

Members and missionaries walk down Main and Parley Streets in Nauvoo on February 2, 2019, to commemorate the 1846 Nauvoo Exodus. The flags represent many of the nationalities of those who lived in Nauvoo in the 1840s. Photo courtesy of Bruce Cornwell.

Members and missionaries ride wagons down Main and Parley Streets in Nauvoo to commemorate the 1846 Nauvoo Exodus. Photo courtesy of Bruce Cornwell.

Members and missionaries ride wagons down Main and Parley Streets in Nauvoo to commemorate the 1846 Nauvoo Exodus. Photo courtesy of Bruce Cornwell.

The Nauvoo Legion leads the walk down Main and Parley Streets in Nauvoo to commemorate the 1846 Nauvoo Exodus. Photo courtesy of Bruce Cornwell.

The Nauvoo Legion leads the walk down Main and Parley Streets in Nauvoo to commemorate the 1846 Nauvoo Exodus. Photo courtesy of Bruce Cornwell.

Minerva Teichert Art & The Book of Mormon

Nauvoo News

When Latter-day Saint artist Minerva Teichert attended the Art Institute of Chicago and the Art Students League of New York in the early 1900s, mural paintings and theatrical pageants were dynamic components of American popular culture. Young Minerva Teichert embraced these popular art forms and used their dramatic style to tell the stories of her religious heritage and the American West.

Though Minerva Teichert had grown up in rural Cokeville, Wyoming, drama, theater, and cinema had played a significant role in her life. Her love of these art forms continued after she left home. In Chicago she studied drama and dance along with her visual art studies. In New York she helped earn her tuition by performing rope tricks and Native American dances.

Minerva Teichert became captivated by the educational potential of large murals in public buildings and their capacity to be seen by great numbers of people from a distance. During Minerva Teichert’s studies in New York, noted American realist painter Robert Henri challenged her to paint the “great Mormon story.” With that goal she painted many theatrical depictions of Mormon pioneers, the West, and Book of Mormon scenes.

Forty-seven of Minerva Teichert’s large-scale narrative murals are on display at the Brigham Young University Museum of Art in Provo, Utah, from July 27, 2007, through May 26, 2008. Copies of some of these murals and large-scale paintings follow.

Minerva Teichert art is on display in several museums around the country.

Touch Me Not,  1939, oil on canvas,  Minerva Teichert Brigham Young University Museum of Art

Touch Me Not, 1939, oil on canvas, Minerva Teichert Brigham Young University Museum of Art

Minerva Teichert  Art - Handcart Pioneers at the Waterfall,  circa 1940, oil on canvas  Courtesy of the Museum of Church History and Art.

Minerva Teichert Art - Handcart Pioneers at the Waterfall, circa 1940, oil on canvas Courtesy of the Museum of Church History and Art.

Minerva Teichert Art Love Story,  1950–51, oil on masonite. Brigham Young University Museum of Art

Minerva Teichert Art Love Story, 1950–51, oil on masonite. Brigham Young University Museum of Art

Minerva Teichert Art Return of Captive Israel,  1945, oil on canvas, Courtesy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Relief Society Building

Minerva Teichert Art Return of Captive Israel, 1945, oil on canvas, Courtesy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Relief Society Building

Minerva Teichert Art An Angel Appears to Alma and the Sons of Mosiah,  1950–51, oil on masonite, 36 x 48 inches. Courtesy of the Brigham Young University Museum of Art, 

Minerva Teichert Art An Angel Appears to Alma and the Sons of Mosiah, 1950–51, oil on masonite, 36 x 48 inches. Courtesy of the Brigham Young University Museum of Art, 

Minerva Teichert Art Get Ye Up into the High Mountain, O Zion,  1949, oil on canvas,

Minerva Teichert Art Get Ye Up into the High Mountain, O Zion, 1949, oil on canvas,

Minerva Teichert Art

Minerva Teichert Art

Missionaries In the Snow - Photo Tour

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS: Missionaries struggle with snow in many places around the globe. Here are some fun great random photos of Missionaries doing just that.

175th Anniversary of Joseph and Hyrum Smith’s Martyrdom -

Nauvoo News

NAUVOO NEWS - This summer will mark 175 years since a mob stormed the Carthage Jail in Illinois and shot the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum Smith. “This June 27th will be a beautiful time to be in Nauvoo. There are several events planned to commemorate the lives of Jospeh & Hyrum Smith” says Kelli Jenkins, Nauvoo Visitors Office Director

President Joseph F. Smith, the son of Hyrum Smith and the sixth President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, recorded these feelings about the martyrdom: “The martyrdom has always been an inspiration to the people of the Lord. It has helped them in their individual trials; has given them courage to pursue a course in righteousness and to know and to live truth, and must ever be held in sacred memory by the Latter-day Saints who have learned the great truths that God revealed through his servant, Joseph Smith”

This year marks the 175th anniversary of that monumental event.

The martyrdom is one of several notable dates and anniversaries for the Church in 2019. The list includes milestones in the Young Women program, a historic site in northern Utah, the first temple built outside the continental United States, and significant moments in the history of missionary work, among others.

One century later

One century after Joseph and Hyrum were killed, the Church purchased land in Spring Hill, Daviess County, Missouri. The property is more commonly known to Latter-day Saints as Adam-ondi-Ahman (see Doctrine and Covenants 116).

The property deeds listed the date June 27, 1944, marking the 100th anniversary of the martyrdom.

Additionally, Church members commemorated the 100th anniversary by holding memorial services. A special service was held at Carthage Jail.

President Howard W. Hunter and other Church leaders visited Carthage Jail and delivered remarks in a special meeting in 1994 to commemorate the 150th anniversary.

Young Women

In November 1869—150 years ago—the Church founded the forerunner for today’s Young Women program.

That year, Brigham Young established the Young Ladies’ Retrenchment Association, later renamed the Young Women Mutual Improvement Association, in the Lion House. The first president of the organization, Elmina Shepherd Taylor, was called in 1880.

In 1944, a plaque dedicated by President Heber J. Grant was placed in the Lion House to celebrate the 75th anniversary.

Golden spike

In May 1869—150 years ago—workers completed the transcontinental railroad at Promontory Summit in Box Elder County. The wedding of the rails strengthened the general economy of the Church in Utah and had a significant impact on immigration.

Temples

In November 1919—100 years ago—President Grant dedicated a new temple in Laie, Hawaii, the fifth temple in the Church and the first to be built outside the continental United States.

In February 1994—25 years ago—the First Presidency announced plans to renovate the Uintah Stake Tabernacle into a temple. When dedicated in 1997, the Vernal Utah Temple, the first existing building to be renovated into a temple, became the state’s 10th temple.

Missionary work

In April 1844—175 years ago—Addison Pratt, Benjamin F. Grouard, and Noah Rogers landed on Tubuai, 350 miles south of Tahiti, and opened missionary work in the South Pacific.

In November 1969—50 years ago—the Southeast Asia Mission formally opened with headquarters in Singapore. The following year, the first missionaries traveled to Indonesia, which was part of the mission.

Change in Church leadership

In May 1994—25 years ago—President Ezra Taft Benson died at age 94 after more than eight years of service as Church President. A short time later, President Hunter was set apart as the new President. He selected President Gordon B. Hinckley and President Thomas S. Monson as his counselors.

Missionaries Now Have More Options to Communicate With Families

Nauvoo News

The First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has announced an update to guidelines regarding communication between full-time missionaries and their families.

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Effective immediately, missionaries may communicate with their families on their weekly preparation day via text messages, online messaging, phone calls and video chat in addition to letters and emails. Previously, missionaries relied primarily on email and letters for communication. 

“Regular communication with their families is an important part of a missionary’s service,” said the First Presidency in a statement. “One of the major purposes of this adjustment is to encourage families to be more involved in their missionary’s efforts and experiences.”

Under these new guidelines, missionaries are encouraged to use judgment in determining the length of phone calls and video chats and to be considerate of their companions. Additionally, to avoid disruption to missionary schedules, family members are asked not to initiate calls or chats but instead should wait for the missionary to contact them on his or her weekly preparation day. If a missionary’s parents live in different locations, he or she may contact each parent separately.

With so many advances in technology, this communication should take place at little or no cost. In those locations where families or missionaries do not have access to computers or phones, missionaries will be encouraged to continue using their current means of communication.

“We encourage missionaries to communicate with their families each week using whatever approved method missionaries decide,” said Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and chairman of the Missionary Executive Council. “This may vary based on their circumstances, locations and schedules for that week. It is not expected that all missionaries will call or video chat with their parents every week. The precise manner of communication is left up to the missionary as he or she decides what will best meet their needs.”

In addition to weekly communication, missionaries are also encouraged to contact family on other special occasions such as Christmas, Mother's Day, Father's Day, parents' birthdays and other culturally significant holidays.

Elder Uchtdorf said the new guidelines offer several additional benefits, including accommodating varied family circumstances as well as better supporting those missionaries who would benefit from increased personal contact with family at home.

Currently, more than 65,000 missionaries serve throughout the world in a variety of countries and cultures as representatives of Jesus Christ. Serving full-time, they study the gospel and teach its life-changing principles to people who are interested. Young men serve for 24 months beginning as early as age 18, and young women may serve for 18 months as early as age 19. They gain valuable and life-changing experiences along the way, giving of themselves and serving others.

“We love the missionaries and know the Lord values their selfless service,” said Elder Uchtdorf. “We continue to try to find the best ways to support and help them and their families while they serve.”

Nauvoo Visitors Guide & Online Tour of Nauvoo

Nauvoo News

Nauvoo Visitors Guide: Whether you’re coming to see the Nauvoo Pageant or Begin your exploration of historic Nauvoo by examining the 1846 relief map of Nauvoo, viewing an introductory video, and studying historic artifacts and displays. Gather information on over two dozen restored homes, shops, and religious buildings in Nauvoo.

Nauvoo—Brigham Young Nauvoo Home

Visit the home of Brigham Young, the second President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, leader of the Church's movement to the West, and first territorial governor of Utah.  350 N Main Street (Main and Cutler) Nauvoo, Illinois


Nauvoo—Carthage Jail Near Nauvoo

On June 27, 1844, the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were martyred—killed by a mob that attacked them in Carthage Jail. Joseph “sealed his mission and his works with his own blood; and so [did] his brother Hyrum. In life they were not divided, and in death they were not separated!” (Doctrine and Covenants 135:3). The original jail in Carthage, Illinois, has been carefully restored and is about a 30-minute drive from Historic Nauvoo. Missionaries lead tours there, where visitors learn about the ministry of Joseph Smith and the final days in the life of Joseph and Hyrum.

At Carthage Jail, visitors also learn about two other men, Elders John Taylor and Willard Richards of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. They were in the jail when the mob attacked, and they survived. The Church itself also survived, as Apostles and others built on the foundation the Lord had established through His servant Joseph Smith.

Nauvoo—Nauvoo Cultural Hall

Visit the heart of Old Nauvoo's social life. During the evening, it's still the place to be! Rendezvous in Old Nauvoo, a musical drama documenting life during the city’s golden age, is performed nightly throughout the year. 350 N Main Street (Main and Cutler) Nauvoo, Illinois







Old & New Beehive Dishes & Dinnerware Collection -

Dena Kennedy

Nauvoo beehive mormon LDS mormon.jpg

NAUVOO REVIEW - Check out this old & new collection of beehive dishes & dinnerware. From the Lion House to the Nauvoo Mercantile antique collection these are some of our favorite beehive & bee dishes.

Nauvoo Exodus Commemoration Draws Hundreds

Dena Kennedy

NAUVOO NEWS - Hundreds gathered in Nauvoo today for the 9th Annual Nauvoo Exodus Commemoration & Reenactment. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints hosts this meaningful event on the first Saturday of February each year to mark the exodus of the Latter-day Saint pioneers from Nauvoo over 170 years ago.

At the free breakfast served to the public at the Family Living Center by the Nauvoo missionaries, President Mark Lusvardi of the Illinois Nauvoo Mission welcomed the crowds and shared some brief remarks. The Family Living Center is located behind the historic Cultural Hall in the center of old Nauvoo.

The marchers formed ranks & companies and were led by a flag bearer and drummer boy. A troop dressed as the Nauvoo Legion then began the hundreds of people, wagons, horses, and oxen to Nauvoo’s Parley street and the Trail of Hope. “This is an amazing event each year and it’s a privilege to participate in it.” said Susan Clark, who drove with her family from Omaha, Nebraska to take part in the commemoration.

Each year, the commemoration has seen an increase in attendance. The Untold Nauvoo Stories Symposium is held on the same weekend making for a busy weekend in Nauvoo.

“We come from the Quad Cities every year and we love it” says Dale Oliver, who has relatives that left with the Saints in 1846. “We wouldn’t miss it”.

“My husband and I are not members of the Mormon faith, we just happened to be in town. It’s really an experience to see all these folks honor their history.” said Elizabeth Finsterwalder from Ames, Iowa. “We feel very luck to have caught this.”


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